British Army Order of Precedence

British Army Order Of Precedence

The regular army of the British Army is listed according to an order of precedence for the purposes of parading. This is the order in which the various corps of the army parade, from right to left, with the unit at the extreme right being highest. Under ordinary circumstances, the Household Cavalry parades at the extreme right of the line. However, when on parade with its guns, it is the Royal Horse Artillery (usually in the form of the King's Troop) that goes to the right. Militia and Territorial Army Units take precedence after Regular units with the exception of The Honourable Artillery Company and The Royal Monmouthshire Royal Engineers.

Read more about British Army Order Of PrecedenceUsual Order of Precedence, Cavalry and Infantry Orders of Precedence, Precedence Within The Territorial Army

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