Bring Me Your Love

Bring Me Your Love is the second album by City and Colour, released on February 12, 2008. According to Billboard, the album debuted at #11 of the Top Heatseekers chart in March 2008.

The songs on this album are more folk-oriented with occasional harmonica, bass, drums, banjo and mandolin as opposed to the previous releases which only consisted of acoustic guitar and piano.

On February 8, the complete album was made available for listening on City and Colour's official MySpace profile.

The music video for the first single, "Waiting...", was released on January 24, 2008 and was listed for 9 weeks on the Canadian Hot 100.

In October, 2008, Dine Alone Records announced a special 2-disc limited edition of Bring Me Your Love to be released on December 2, 2008. Only 6000 copies were made available. In Canada, when the record label put up the album on pre-sale on November 20, 2008, so many fans tried to pre-order it that they crashed the store's website.

Gordon Downie, of The Tragically Hip makes an appearance on the album, lending his vocals to the third verse on the second single, "Sleeping Sickness" which was listed for 9 weeks on the Canadian Hot 100. The video for "Sleeping Sickness", directed by Montreal-based director Vincent Morisset, was released on June 27, 2008, with an interactive version being available on the group's official website.

The album is named after a short story by Charles Bukowski. It is also a line sung in the closing track, "As Much as I Ever Could".

When interviewed by Alter The Press! in October 2009, Dallas revealed "Bring Me Your Love" will see a vinyl release with no release date scheduled yet.

Read more about Bring Me Your Love:  Track List, Personnel

Famous quotes containing the words love and/or bring:

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    Benjamin Disraeli (1804–1881)

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