Bring Me Sunshine (1994)

Bring Me Sunshine (1994) was originally a three-part retrospective in tribute to Eric Morecambe and was hosted by the comedian and author Ben Elton; the first episode was screened on May 14, 1994, which would have been his 68th birthday and featured interviews with many people who had guest starred in The Morecambe & Wise Show during its run from 1968 to 1977 and also had a host of memorable clips from the shows. Those interviewed included John Thaw, Roy Castle who died a few months afterwards, Diana Rigg as well as comments and tributes from modern day double acts Hale & Pace and Fry & Laurie.

Such was the popularity of the show (which aired in a Saturday evening prime-time slot) that three further editions were hastily commissioned and shown on BBC1 but the three later additions did not include interviews, just classic clips. This meant that the duo, having last performed together in late 1983, made an unexpected and triumphant return to prime time television after a break of over 10 years. Ernie Wise was not asked to participate, which upset him; he was quoted as saying "...you'd have thought they'd have asked for my memories...". The BBC said they didn't want "Too many talking heads".

The programmes did much to lift the profile of the double-act, and began a resurgence of interest in their work. In late 1998, Wise was invited to take part in the documentary "Bring Me Sunshine: The Heart and Soul of Eric Morecambe", but he was too ill. He died on March 21, 1999.

Famous quotes containing the words sunshine and/or bring:

    In an ancient and dead language, any recognition of living nature attracts us. These are such sentences as were written while grass grew and water ran. It is no small recommendation when a book will stand the test of mere unobstructed sunshine and daylight.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    He loved strange thought
    And knew that sweet extremity of pride
    That’s called platonic love,
    And that to such a pitch of passion wrought
    Nothing could bring him, when his lady died,
    Anodyne for his love.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)