Brad Young

For the Australian ice hockey player, see Bradley Young (ice hockey).
Bradley Young
Personal information
Full name Bradley Evan Young
Born (1973-02-23) 23 February 1973 (age 39)
Adelaide, Australia
Batting style Right-handed
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox
Role bowler
International information
National side Australia
ODI debut 18 January 1998 v South Africa
Last ODI 13 January 1999 v Sri Lanka
Domestic team information
Years Team
1996/97–2002/03 South Australia
Career statistics
Test ODI FC LA
- 6 54 65
- 31 2119 660
- 15.50 28.63 16.50
- –/– 3/8 –/1
- 18 122 56
- 234 13038 2574
- 1 141 56
- 251.00 44.71 37.35
- - 5 -
- n/a - n/a
- 1/26 6/85 4/4
- 2/– 44/– 36/–
Source: Cricinfo, 7 September 2011

Bradley Evan Young (born 23 February 1973) is a former Australian cricketer. A left-arm orthodox spinner who was also an aggressive lower order right hand batsman, Young played six One Day Internationals for Australia in the 1998/99 period. Young was selected for Australia at the 1998 Commonwealth Games in Kuala Lumpar, taking a hat trick against New Zealand and winning a silver medal after losing to South Africa in the final.

Young's final match for Australia ended after he slid into the fence trying to prevent a boundary and needed to be carried from the Sydney Cricket Ground in considerable pain after injuring his leg.

In 1998 and 2001 Young was the professional for Lancashire League team East Lancashire Cricket Club.

Young currently captains Grange Cricket Club in the Adelaide Turf Cricket association.

On 12 December 2012, Young signed with the Adelaide Strikers, as a replacement for the injured Jon Holland.

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    Fredric M. Frank (1911–1977)