Born in America

Born in America is the fifth studio album by American heavy metal band Riot, released in 1983. After getting dropped by Elektra Records the band signed with Canadian indie label Quality Records for what was to be the last record with Rhett Forrester on vocals. The album would also mark the end of the line for guitarist Rick Ventura, bassist Kip Leming, and drummer Sandy Slavin.

Germany's ZYX Music released the album in Europe, accompanied by a 12" single, Warrior (live) b/w Born in America.

Born In America was re-issued in 1989 by Grand Slamm Records in the U.S. and CBS/Sony Records in Japan, both with different artwork. A further U.S. re-issue followed in 1999 through Metal Blade Records, utilizing the original cover artwork.

Read more about Born In America:  Track Listing

Famous quotes containing the words born in america, born in, america and/or born:

    If you’re born in America with a black skin, you’re born in prison, and the masses of black people in America today are beginning to regard our plight or predicament in this society as one of a prison inmate.
    Malcolm X (1925–1965)

    One reason—perhaps the chief—of the virility of the Roosevelts is [their] very democratic spirit. They have never felt that because they were born in a good position they could put their hands in their pockets and succeed. They have felt, rather, that being born in a good position, there is no excuse for them if they did not do their duty by the community.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)

    What you have to do is enter the fiction of America, enter America as fiction. It is, indeed, on this fictive basis that it dominates the world.
    Jean Baudrillard (b. 1929)

    I wasn’t born to be a fighter. I was born with a gentle nature, a flexible character and an organism as equilibrated as it is judged hysterical. I shouldn’t have been forced to fight constantly and ferociously. The causes I have fought for have invariably been causes that should have been gained by a delicate suggestion. Since they never were, I made myself into a fighter.
    Margaret Anderson (1886–1973)