Blake Hall

Blake Hall is a country house and gardens near Chipping Ongar in Essex.

The house is based around an original fabric dating from the 17th century or older, but was largely rebuilt in the 18th century and later remodelled by George Basevi in 1822. It was home of the Capel Cure family for over 200 years.

After the operations centre at nearby RAF North Weald for Sector E, No. 11 Group RAF was bombed by the Luftwaffe in September 1940 during the Battle of Britain, floors and interior walls from a portion of Blake Hall were removed, and a new "ops room" (Operations Room) substituted.

The Grade II* listed building is now set at the heart of its own conservation area. It is available to hire for weddings and civil ceremonies.

Blake Hall station, now closed, was named after the hall though it was about a mile to the south-west.

Other articles related to "blake hall, blake, hall":

Northfield Mount Hermon School - Campus - Classroom Buildings
1st floor physics 2nd floor chemistry 3rd floor biology Blake Hall – Donated by S ... Prestley Blake in 1993, Blake Hall contains 5 classrooms for humanities, and the religious studies office ... Grandin Auditorium is in the oldest portion of the building, originally known as Camp Hall ...
Blake Hall Tube Station
... Blake Hall station is a disused station in Essex, formerly on the Central Line of the London Underground between North Weald and Ongar ... It was named after Blake Hall, a country house located a mile or so to the north east of the station in the village of Bobbingworth, and inhabited by a family of substantial local land owners ...
Anne Brontë - Employment At Blake Hall
... In April, 1839, Anne started work as a governess for the Ingham family at Blake Hall, near Mirfield ... The episode at Blake Hall was so traumatic that she reproduced it in almost perfect detail in her novel, Agnes Grey ...

Famous quotes containing the words hall and/or blake:

    I was afraid the waking arm would break
    From the loose earth and rub against his eyes
    A fist of trees, and the whole country tremble
    In the exultant labor of his rise;
    —Donald Hall (b. 1928)

    What the hammer?What the chain?
    In what furnace was thy brain?
    What the anvil?What dread grasp
    Dare its deadly terrors clasp?
    —William Blake (1757–1827)