Blaise Pascal University

Blaise Pascal University (French: Université Blaise-Pascal), also known as Université Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand II or just Clermont-Ferrand II, is a public university with its main campus on 53 acres (210,000 m2) in Clermont-Ferrand, France, with satellite locations in other parts of the region of Auvergne, including Vichy, Moulins, Montlucon, and Aubière.

It was founded in 1854, as part of Clermont Ferrand University, but was not named Blaise Pascal University until 1987. It is named for mathematician, scientist, and philosopher Blaise Pascal, who was born in Clermont.

For the 2009-2010 academic year, the university had an enrollment of 14400 students, of which nearly 2000 were foreign students. Additionally, it had 970 research professors between its multiple campuses. Students may choose from among 250 degrees and programs.

It offers bachelor's, master, and doctorate degrees in Arts and Humanities, Engineering, Language and Cultural Studies, and Science and Technology. It also offers bachelor's or master degrees in Business and Social Science.

Other articles related to "blaise pascal":

List Of Schools In France - Lycées
... Annecy Lycée Bertran de Born, Périgueux Lycée Bertrand D'Argentré, Vitré Lycée Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand Lycée Blaise Pascal, Orsay Lycée Blaise Pascal ...

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    All great amusements are dangerous to the Christian life; but among all those which the world has invented there is none more to be feared than the theater. It is a representation of the passions so natural and so delicate that it excites them and gives birth to them in our hearts, and, above all, to that of love.
    Blaise Pascal (1623–1662)

    Poetry presents indivisible wholes of human consciousness, modified and ordered by the stringent requirements of form. Prose, aiming at a definite and concrete goal, generally suppresses everything inessential to its purpose; poetry, existing only to exhibit itself as an aesthetic object, aims only at completeness and perfection of form.
    Richard Harter Fogle, U.S. critic, educator. The Imagery of Keats and Shelley, ch. 1, University of North Carolina Press (1949)

    Knowledge has two extremes. The first is the pure natural ignorance in which all men find themselves at birth. The other extreme is that reached by great minds, who, having run through all that men can know, find they know nothing, and come back again to that same natural ignorance from which they set out; this is a learned ignorance which is conscious of itself.
    —Blaise Pascal (1623–1662)