Black Mountain Side

"Black Mountain Side" is an instrumental by the English rock band Led Zeppelin, featured on the band's 1969 debut album Led Zeppelin. It was recorded at Olympic Studios, London in October 1968.

Read more about Black Mountain Side:  Song Structure, Personnel

Other articles related to "black mountain side, black, mountain, mountains":

Definitive Collection Mini LP Replica CD Boxset - Track Listing
... "Black Mountain Side" Page 213 7 ... "Black Dog" Jones, Page, and Plant 457 2 ... "Misty Mountain Hop" Jones, Page, and Plant 438 6 ...
Ruidoso, New Mexico
... A mountain resort town, Ruidoso lies in the rugged Sierra Blanca mountain range of southcentral New Mexico, where it merges with the Sacramento Mountains to the south ... Apache, the Mescalero Apache Indian-owned ski resort on the 12,000-foot (3,700 m) mountain Sierra Blanca ... The tribe also operates the Inn of the Mountain Gods resort in the area, which includes a casino, hotel, and golf course ...
King In The Mountain - General Features
... King in the mountain stories involve legendary heroes, often accompanied by armed retainers, sleeping in remote dwellings, including caves on high ... consequence in the history of the nation where the mountain is located ... indicative of the long time he has slept beneath the mountain ...
Mountain - Geology - Mid-ocean Ridges
... sea-floor spreading are often referred to as undersea mountain ranges due to their bathymetric prominence ...
King In The Mountain
... A king in the mountain, king under the mountain or sleeping hero is a prominent motif in folklore and mythology that is found in many folktales and legends ...

Famous quotes containing the words mountain side, side, black and/or mountain:

    I thought of Chatterton, the marvellous boy,
    The sleepless soul that perished in his pride;
    Of him who walked in glory and in joy
    Following his plough, along the mountain side:
    By our own spirits are we deified:
    We poets in our youth begin in gladness;
    But thereof come in the end despondency and madness.
    William Wordsworth (1770–1850)

    As a particularly dramatic gesture, he throws wide his arms and whacks the side of the barn with the heavy cane he uses to stab at contesting bidders. With more vehemence than grammatical elegance, he calls upon the great god Caveat Emptor to witness with what niggardly stinginess these flinty sons of Scotland make cautious offers for what is beyond any question the finest animal ever beheld.
    —Administration in the State of Arka, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    Thus while I sit and sigh the day
    With all his borrow’d lights away,
    Till night’s black wings do overtake me,
    Thinking on thee, thy beauties then,
    As sudden lights do sleepy men,
    So they by their bright rays awake me.
    Sir John Suckling (1609–1642)

    ... the deep experience of the lonely climb on the mountain of success brings a wealth beyond power to compute. To you all suffering is understandable and your heart opens wide in sympathy.
    Alice Foote MacDougall (1867–1945)