Black Liquor Dry

Some articles on black liquor dry, black liquor, dry:

Recovery Boiler - Black Liquor Dry Solids
... As fired black liquor is a mixture of organics, inorganics and water ... Typically the amount of water is expressed as mass ratio of dried black liquor to unit of black liquor before drying ... This ratio is called the black liquor dry solids ...
High Temperature and Pressure Recovery Boiler - Modern Recovery Boiler
... now Metso Power inc.) for a large recovery boiler having a capacity of 4,000,000 lb of black liquor solids per day for a boiler in Skutskär, Sweden, but this design was rejected ... The effect of increasing dry solids concentration has had a significant effect on the main operating variables ... The steam flow increases with increasing black liquor dry solids content ...

Famous quotes containing the words dry, black and/or liquor:

    But oh, not the hills of Habersham,
    And oh, not the valleys of Hall
    Avail: I am fain for to water the plain.
    Downward, the voices of Duty call—
    Downward, to toil and be mixed with the main,
    The dry fields burn, and the mills are to turn,
    And a myriad flowers mortally yearn,
    And the lordly main from beyond the plain
    Calls o’er the hills of Habersham,
    Calls through the valleys of Hall.
    Sidney Lanier (1842–1881)

    Night City was like a deranged experiment in Social Darwinism, designed by a bored researcher who kept one thumb permanently on the fast-forward button. Stop hustling and you sank without a trace, but move a little too swiftly and you’d break the fragile surface tension of the black market; either way, you were gone ... though heart or lungs or kidneys might survive in the service of some stranger with New Yen for the clinic tanks.
    William Gibson (b. 1948)

    No power on earth or above the bottomless pit has such influence to terrorize and make cowards of men as the liquor power. Satan could not have fallen on a more potent instrument with which to thrall the world. Alcohol is king!
    Eliza “Mother” Stewart (1816–c. 1908)