Birthplace

  • (noun): Where something originated or was nurtured in its early existence.
    Example: "The birthplace of civilization"
    Synonyms: cradle, place of origin, provenance
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on birthplace:

Thomas Alva Edison Birthplace
... Thomas Alva Edison Birthplace is the historic house in which the American inventor Thomas Alva Edison was born on February 11, 1847 ... It is now the Edison Birthplace Museum ...
Shakespeare's Birthplace - History - Restoration
... Originally the Birthplace formed part of a terrace with later houses built either side, and the first stage in its conservation was their destruction, thought necessary to avoid the risk of any fire spreading ... Old photographs reveal that early in the 19th century, part of the front of the Birthplace was faced with brick ...
List Of Historical Makeup Of The Politburo Standing Committee Of The Communist Party Of China - 16th PSC (2002–2007)
... of the PRC Central Military Commission Birthplace Jiangyan, Taizhou, Jiangsu NPC Constituency Zhejiang At-large 2nd Name Wu Bangguo Party secretary of the Standing Committee of the National People's ...
Shakespeare's Birthplace - Present Day
... Adjoining the Birthplace is the Shakespeare Centre, a contrasting modern glass and concrete visitors centre which forms the headquarters of the Shakespeare ... Shakespeare-related displays, the Shakespeare Centre also provides public access to the Birthplace ... The Birthplace recreates a picture of family life at the time of Shakespeare complete with period domestic furnishings, a glass window inscribed with the signatures of visitors to the ...
Salmon P. Chase Birthplace
... Salmon P ... Chase Birthplace was the birthplace and childhood home of Salmon P ...

More definitions of "birthplace":

Famous quotes containing the word birthplace:

    The settlement of America had its origins in the unsettlement of Europe. America came into existence when the European was already so distant from the ancient ideas and ways of his birthplace that the whole span of the Atlantic did not widen the gulf.
    Lewis Mumford (1895–1990)

    In most nineteenth-century cities, both large and small, more than 50 percent—and often up to 75 percent—of the residents in any given year were no longer there ten years later. People born in the twentieth century are much more likely to live near their birthplace than were people born in the nineteenth century.
    Stephanie Coontz (20th century)