Binocular

Binocular may refer to:

  • Binocular vision, seeing with two eyes
  • Binoculars, a telescopic tool
  • Binocular, a thoroughbred race horse
  • Binocular (band), Kevin Rudolf's band that released a self-titled album in 2001.

Other articles related to "binocular, binoculars":

Early Theories of Binocular Rivalry
... Various theories were proposed to account for binocular rivalry ... Wheatsone also discovered binocular stereopsis, the perception of depth arising from the lateral placement of the eyes ... of stereopsis supported fusion theory, he still had to account for binocular rivalry ...
Stalk-eyed Fly - Behavior - Vision
... Thus, there is extensive binocular overlap, with about 70% of the ommatidia of each eye having a binocular partner ommatidia in the opposite eye which views in the same direction ... The binocular field is most extensive in the frontoventral quadrant, where it reaches over 135 °, and is smallest in the dorsal region ...
Cyclopean Stimuli
... stimuli is a form of visual stimuli that is defined by binocular disparity alone ... is sufficient for stereopsis, where Charles Wheatstone had only shown that binocular disparity was necessary for stereopsis ... a cyclopean stimulus, because having only one eye, he would not have been able to perceive binocular depth cues such as binocular disparity ...
Binoviewer
... A binoviewer is an optical device designed to enable binocular viewing through a single objective ... In contrast to binoculars, it does not allow stereoscopic viewing, as both images are produced by the same objective and do not differ except for aberrations induced ... However, binocular viewing allows the brain's visual system to make use of binocular summation, resulting in a more relaxed viewing experience and an increased ability of detecting faint details ...
Stereopsis
... of depth that is perceived when a scene is viewed with both eyes by someone with normal binocular vision ... Binocular viewing of a scene creates two slightly different images of the scene in the two eyes due to the eyes' different positions on the head ... These differences, referred to as binocular disparity, provide information that the brain can use to calculate depth in the visual scene, providing a major means of depth perception ...