Big Drill Car

Big Drill Car was a pop punk/melodic hardcore group from Huntington Beach, California, who were active from the late 1980s to mid-1990s and briefly again in the mid-2000s (decade). The group never gained any mainstream audience, but were an influence on their contemporaries – most notably ALL, Chemical People and Dag Nasty – alongside whom they are considered the early pioneers of the sound that would later be called melodic hardcore.

Big Drill Car released an EP, Small Block, in 1988 before being signed to Cruz Records (owned by former Black Flag guitarist Greg Ginn) and releasing two studio albums. The band eventually parted ways with that label and signed to Headhunter Records, who released No Worse for the Wear, the band's last album to date.

Big Drill Car broke up in 1995, but reunited for a one-off series of shows in 2008 and 2009, with the classic original lineup.

Read more about Big Drill CarLine-ups, Known Associates

Other articles related to "big drill car":

Small Block (album)
... Small Block is the debut EP of the Huntington Beach pop punk band Big Drill Car, released in 1988 on their own Varient Records! label and again in 1990 on Cruz Records ... To save money on mastering, Big Drill Car placed all six tracks on the A-side of the record, not only to let the B-side remain shiny and smooth, but also to save listeners the ... —Frank Daly, Flipside, May-June 1990 Like many Big Drill Car albums, Small Block is currently out of print ...

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