Big City (comics)

Big City (comics)

Brainiac is a fictional character, a supervillain that appears in comic books published by DC Comics. The character first appeared in Action Comics #242 (July 1958), and was created by Otto Binder and Al Plastino.

An extraterrestrial android (in most incarnations), Brainiac is a principal foe of Superman, and is responsible for shrinking and stealing Kandor, the capital city of Superman's home planet Krypton. Due to complex storylines involving time travel, cloning, and revisions of DC's continuity, several variations of Brainiac have appeared. Most incarnations of Brainiac depict him as a green-skinned being in humanoid form. He is bald, except for a set of diodes protruding from his skull.

The character is the origin of the informal word which means "genius". The name itself is a portmanteau of the words brain and maniac, with influence from ENIAC, the name of an early computer. In 2009, Brainiac was ranked as IGN's 17th Greatest Comic Book Villain of All Time.

Read more about Big City (comics):  Powers and Abilities, Alternative Versions, Cultural References

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Big City (comics) - Cultural References
... The lyrics include references to the bottled cityof Kandor and the Daily Planet ... well, Brainiac is the character in the Superman comics the evil genius with the green skin and the sort of lightbulb screwed in his head ... In The BigBang Theory, Leonard tried to impress Penny by showing her the miniature replica of Kandor and mentions Brainiac ...

Famous quotes containing the words big and/or city:

    I’m headed for a land that’s far away
    Beside the crystal fountains.
    So come with me, we’ll go and see
    The Big Rock Candy Mountains.
    —Unknown. The Big Rock Candy Mountains (l. 5–8)

    The city is a fact in nature, like a cave, a run of mackerel or an ant-heap. But it is also a conscious work of art, and it holds within its communal framework many simpler and more personal forms of art. Mind takes form in the city; and in turn, urban forms condition mind.
    Lewis Mumford (1895–1990)