Best of The Best Volume 2: 20 Years of The Year's Best Short Science Fiction Novels

Best of the Best Volume 2: 20 Years of the Year's Best Short Science Fiction Novels (ISBN 978-0312363413) is a science fiction anthology edited by Gardner Dozois that was published in 2007. It is a special edition in The Year's Best Science Fiction series.

Read more about Best Of The Best Volume 2: 20 Years Of The Year's Best Short Science Fiction Novels:  Contents

Famous quotes containing the words science, fiction, novels, short, volume, year and/or years:

    The universe is the externisation of the soul. Wherever the life is, that bursts into appearance around it. Our science is sensual, and therefore superficial. The earth, and the heavenly bodies, physics, and chemistry, we sensually treat, as if they were self-existent; but these are the retinue of that Being we have.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    A fiction about soft or easy deaths ... is part of the mythology of most diseases that are not considered shameful or demeaning.
    Susan Sontag (b. 1933)

    I have just opened Bacon’s “Advancement of Learning” for the first time, which I read with great delight. It is more like what Scott’s novels were than anything.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Jealousy is never satisfied with anything short of an omniscience that would detect the subtlest fold of the heart.
    George Eliot [Mary Ann (or Marian)

    The other 1000 are principally the ‘old Yankee stock,’ who have lost the town, politically, to the Portuguese; who deplore the influx of the ‘off-Cape furriners’; and to whom a volume of genealogy is a piece of escape literature.
    —For the State of Massachusetts, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    A man I praise that once in Tara’s Halls
    Said to the woman on his knees, “Lie still,
    My hundredth year is at an end. I think
    That something is about to happen, I think
    That the adventure of old age begins....”
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    It is now many years that men have resorted to the forest for fuel and the materials of the arts: the New Englander and the New Hollander, the Parisian and the Celt, the farmer and Robin Hood, Goody Blake and Harry Gill; in most parts of the world, the prince and the peasant, the scholar and the savage, equally require still a few sticks from the forest to warm them and cook their food. Neither could I do without them.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)