Bertha Hirsch Baruch

Bertha Hirsch Baruch was an American (California) writer and suffragette.

Bertha Hirsch Baruch was born in the Province of Posen, Germany. She came to New London, Connecticut with her father in 1876. She wrote poetry in her teens and was encouraged by Rose Hawthorne Lathrop in her literary efforts. Active in College Settlement and Univ. Ext. work, she attended Pennsylvania University and Yale. She was on the editorial staff for the Los Angeles Times. In 1906 she lived at 1168 W. 36th St., Los Angeles, California.

Active in the women's suffrage movement, Mrs. Baruch was the county president of the Los Angeles Suffrage Association in 1905 when two conventions were hosted:

  • the Women’s Parliament, October 10–11, and
  • the county convention of the Equal Suffrage League October 12.

In 1908 she was the treasurer of the Los Angeles Jewish Women’s Foreign Relief Association.

Famous quotes containing the words baruch, bertha and/or hirsch:

    The mother whose self-image is dependent on her children places on those children the responsibility for her own identity, and her involvement in the details of their lives can put great pressure on the children. A child suffers when everything he or she does is extremely important to a parent; this kind of over-involvement can turn even a small problem into a crisis.
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