Benefice

A benefice ( /ˈbɛnɪfɪs/) is a reward received in exchange for services rendered and as a retainer for future services. The Roman Empire began using latin term beneficium as a benefit to an individual from the Empire for services rendered. Its use was adopted by the western church in the Carolingian Era as a benefit bestowed by the crown or church officials. A benefice specifically from a church is called a precaria (pl. precarii) such as a stipend and one from a monarch or nobleman is usually called a fief. A benefice is distinct from an allod, in that an allod is property owned outright, not bestowed by a higher authority.

Other articles related to "benefice, benefices":

Canonical Institution - Benefices
... denotes any manner, in accordance with canon law, of acquiring an ecclesiastical benefice ... its strictest sense, the word denotes the collation of an ecclesiastical benefice by a legitimate authority, on the presentation of a candidate by a third person (institutio tituli collativa) ... The term is used also for the actual putting in possession of a benefice (institutio corporalis), and for the approbation requisite for the exercising of the ecclesiastical ministry when an authority inferior ...
Canonical Provision - Analysis
... In various ways a person may be designated to fill a vacant benefice by election, postulation, presentation, or recommendation, resignation made in one's favour, or approved exchange ... to the pope, together with privation of the fruits of the benefice and the nominee loses ipso facto all right to the prelacy ... Ordinarily greater benefices are conferred by the pope minor benefices by the bishop, who as a rule has the power of appointing to all benefices in his diocese ...
Congrua Portio - History
... Owing to the many charges to which a benefice is liable, it became necessary for the ecclesiastical authority to decree that first and foremost the proper sustenance of the holder of the ... This was all the more necessary in cases where benefices had been incorporated with monasteries or collegiate churches ... Very often the curate of such incorporated benefices received only one-sixteenth of the revenue ...
Incumbent (ecclesiastical)
... incumbent refers to the holder of a Church of England parochial charge or benefice ... The term benefice originally denoted a grant of land for life in return for services ... Historically, once in possession of the benefice, the holder had lifelong tenure unless he failed to provide the required minimum of spiritual services or committed a ...
Benefice - History - Suitability of Parochial Clergy - Pluralism in England
... a clerk to hold several ecclesiastical dignities or benefices at the same time, was transferred to the Archbishop of Canterbury by the Peterpence ... was passed to abridge the holding of benefices in plurality, requiring that no person should hold under any circumstances more than two benefices and ... narrowed so that no spiritual person could hold two benefices except the churches of such benefices within 3 miles (4.8 km) of each other by the nearest ...