Beşiktaş J.K. - Legend of The Black Eagles

Legend of The Black Eagles

There is a legend surrounding the initial naming of the team "The Black Eagles." Beşiktaş, the title holder of the previous two seasons started the 1940–41 season with a young and renewed team. Beşiktaş, which opened up its lead as weeks went by, was the leader in the league. With five weeks remaining to the end, the opponent was Süleymaniye. Beşiktaş had started the game in Şeref Stadium refereed by Semih Turansoy on Sunday January 19, 1941, with the following players: Faruk, Yavuz, İbrahim, Rıfat, Halil, Hüseyin, Şakir, Hakkı, Şükrü, Şeref, Eşref. As in all games of that season, the team played well. Halfway through the second half of the game, Beşiktaş attacked continuously despite being in front. And then, according to legend, a voice was heard from the stands towards which Beşiktaş was attacking. The voice said "Come on Black Eagles. Attack Black Eagles". The Beşiktaş players who had so successfully defeated their opponents that season, being described as "Black Eagles” and the football they played compared to “Attacking like Black Eagles”. According to legend, the owner of the voice from the stands was a fisherman called Mehmet Galin. Beşiktaş closed the game with a 6–0 win with 3 goals volleyed in by Şeref Görkey, who was known as volleyer Şeref and one goal each by Captain Hakkı, Şakir and Şükrü.

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