Bayer School of Natural and Environmental Sciences

The Bayer School of Natural and Environmental Sciences (BSNES) is a fully accredited degree-granting institution and the primary college of undergraduate and graduate scientific research at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It was formed in 1994 with the separation of the Biological Sciences, Chemistry, and Biochemistry departments from the former College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and subsequently named in honor of the Bayer Corporation. The school currently houses the departments of Biological Sciences, Biotechnology, Biochemistry, Chemistry, Environmental Science & Management, Forensic Science & Law, and Physics. The school also collaborates closely with the Mylan School of Pharmacy. In 2010, the department of Chemistry and Biochemistry was designated as a Mass Spectrometry Center of Excellence by Agilent Technologies, allowing for collaborative research into metabolics, proteomics, disease biomarkers, and environmental analysis. In 2011, Duquesne University became one of 98 universities nationwide, and one of nine Catholic universities, to be designated as a high research activity institution by the Carnegie Foundation.

Read more about Bayer School Of Natural And Environmental Sciences:  Areas of Study, Research Facilities, Administration

Other articles related to "bayer school of natural and environmental sciences, sciences, environmental, science":

Bayer School Of Natural And Environmental Sciences - Administration
... Department of Biological Sciences Center for Environmental Research and Education Department of Forensic Science and Law ...

Famous quotes containing the words sciences, school and/or natural:

    The best thing about the sciences is their philosophical ingredient, like life for an organic body. If one dephilosophizes the sciences, what remains left? Earth, air, and water.
    Novalis [Friedrich Von Hardenberg] (1772–1801)

    By school age, many boys experience pressure to reveal inner feelings as humiliating. They think their mothers are saying to them, “You must be hiding something shameful.” And shucking clams is a snap compared to prying secrets out of a boy who’s decided to “clam up.”
    Ron Taffel (20th century)

    We have perhaps a natural fear of ends. We would rather be always on the way than arrive. Given the means, we hang on to them and often forget the ends.
    Eric Hoffer (1902–1983)