Battlestar Galactica - Comic Books

Comic Books

Main article: Battlestar Galactica (comics)

A series of comic book publishers have adapted Battlestar Galactica since its inception.

Marvel Comics published a 23-issue comic book series based upon the show between 1978 and 1981. Walt Simonson, who later wrote and drew Thor, and also had a long stint on Marvel's Star Wars comic, was the artist for the series at its conclusion. Other comics have since been published by Maximum Press, Grandreams, Look-in Magazine, Realm Press and, currently, Dynamite Comics. Of all these series, only those by Marvel, Grandreams and Look-In actually completed their storylines and brought the story to a conclusion. All the other series were cancelled at various points during their run, with no resolutions.

Both the Grandreams and Look-In comic strips take place early in the series. The other comic series based on the 1978 series have been set after the final episode of the series and ignored Galactica 1980.

The Maximum Press series began with the discovery of a completely unpopulated Earth some fifteen years after the conclusion of the TV show. The look and the feel of the comics had been changed considerably from the series, to give the stories a "more nineties" feel.

The Realm Press series picked up immediately after the conclusion of the final episode of the original series in an attempt to present what they called "Season Two" of the original show.

Dynamite Entertainment was the last company to publish comic books featuring both the classic and reimagined Battlestar Galactica series. They also released a 4-issue Galactica 1980 comic miniseries written by Marc Guggenheim. The limited miniseries was a re-imagining of the original series but at the end featured a second, smaller Battlestar (replacing the original which was destroyed) also named Galactica but strongly resembling the ship seen in the reimagined Sci-Fi Channel series.

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