Battle of Dessau Bridge

The Battle of Dessau Bridge (German: Schlacht bei Dessau) was a significant battle of the Thirty Years' War between Danish Protestants and the Imperial German Catholic forces on the Elbe River outside of Dessau, Germany on April 25, 1626. This battle was an attempt by Ernst von Mansfeld to cross the Dessau Bridge in order to invade the headquarters of the Imperial German army in Magdeburg, Germany. The Dessau bridge was the only land access between Magdeburg and Dresden, which made it difficult for the Danes to advance. The Count of Tilly wanted control of the bridge in order to prevent King Christian IV of Denmark from having access to Cassell and to protect the Lower Saxon Circle. The Imperial German forces of Albrecht von Wallenstein handily defeated the Protestant forces of Ernst von Mansfeld in this battle.

Read more about Battle Of Dessau BridgePreparation For Battle, Battle and Outcome

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Battle Of Dessau Bridge - Battle and Outcome
... In April of 1625, Mansfeld and his army moved quick as possible to Dessau as well as Wallenstein and the Imperial German army ... and his men arrived first, thus allowing them to form their "death trap" at the Dessau Bridge, deploying the heavy artillery which they possessed ... On April 25, the battle began and the troops of Aldringen held off Mansfeld and his troops as they attempted to push across the bridge and river ...

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