Baruch College Campus High School

Baruch College Campus High School (BCCHS) is a public high school located in the Flatiron District in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. Baruch College Campus High School received the highest number of applications among all of the New York City public high schools in 2011. BCCHS is renowned for its high academic standards, advisory program and perfect graduation rate. In 2012, BCCHS ranked 489 in the U.S. News & World Report list of best "gold-medal" U.S. high schools.

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Broadway (New York City) - Route
... Columbus Avenue and West 65th Street, Broadway passes by the Juilliard School and Lincoln Center, both well-known performing arts landmarks, as well ... the main spine of the Upper West Side, passing the campus of Columbia University at 116th Street in Morningside Heights, in part on the tract that housed the Bloomingdale (Lunatic) Asylum from 1808 until it moved to ... Heights, Broadway passes the handsome, park-like campus of Barnard College ...

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