Barbarian II: The Dungeon of Drax

Barbarian II: The Dungeon of Drax is a video game first published in 1988 for various home computers. It was also released as Axe of Rage in North America. The game is the sequel to Barbarian: The Ultimate Warrior (Death Sword in North America), which was published in 1987. In Barbarian II, the player controls a princess or barbarian character, exploring the game world to locate and defeat an evil wizard. The game's plot is an extension of its predecessor, although the gameplay is different. While the first game offers two players the opportunity for virtual head-to-head combat, the second is solely a single-player adventure with fewer fighting moves.

Palace Software, the developer of the two Barbarian games, marketed the sequel with the same strategy they used for the first game. They hired Maria Whittaker, a model known for her topless work, to pose on the cover and posters as the princess in the game, attempting to recapture the controversy that had boosted sales. Barbarian II received a mixed critical reception. Reviewers were split in their opinions over whether the game was a refreshing and gory adventure, or a boring and lonely sojourn through a confusing digital world.

Read more about Barbarian II: The Dungeon Of Drax:  Gameplay, Development, Reception

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Barbarian II: The Dungeon Of Drax - Reception
96% ACE 754 Awards Entity Award Zzap!64 Gold Medal Barbarian II received praise for its audio, mostly for the versions on more powerful platforms ... had another grouse with the combat, moaning the loss of simplicity from the Barbarian series ... to him, while players could enjoy the first Barbarian game without much effort, intense practise was needed to defeat the monsters in the second game ...

Famous quotes containing the words dungeon and/or barbarian:

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