Banda Islands

The Banda Islands (Indonesian: Kepulauan Banda) are a volcanic group of ten small volcanic islands in the Banda Sea, about 140 km (87 mi) south of Seram Island and about 2,000 km (1,243 mi) east of Java, and are part of the Indonesian province of Maluku. The main town and administrative centre is Bandanaira, located on the island of the same name. They rise out of 4–6 km deep ocean and have a total land area of approximately 180 km2. They have a population of about 15,000. Until the mid-19th century the Banda Islands were the world's only source of the spices nutmeg and mace, produced from the nutmeg tree. The islands are also popular destinations for scuba diving and snorkeling.

Read more about Banda IslandsGeography, Bandanese Culture

Other articles related to "banda islands, banda, bandas":

Banda Islands - Bandanese Culture
... Most of the present-day inhabitants of the Banda Islands are descended from migrants and plantation labourers from various parts of Indonesia, as well as from indigenous Bandanese ... lastek (Dutch lastig) floor plur (Dutch vloer) porch stup (Dutch stoep) Banda Malay shares many Portuguese loanwords with Ambonese Malay not appearing in the national language, Indonesian ... Examples turtle tetaruga (Banda Malay) totoruga (Ambonese Malay) (from Portuguese tartaruga) throat gargontong (Banda Malay) gargangtang (Ambonese Malay ...
Nutmeg - History
... The small Banda Islands were, until the mid-19th century, the world's only source of nutmeg and mace ... of that year, after having secured Malacca and learning of the Bandas' location, Albuquerque sent an expedition of three ships led by his friend António de ... or forcibly conscripted, guided them via Java, the Lesser Sundas and Ambon to Banda, arriving in early 1512 ...

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