Bachelor

A bachelor is a man who is not married (see single person) or who is not in a pair bond. It includes "men who live independently, outside of their parents' home and other institutional settings, who are neither married nor cohabitating".

Read more about Bachelor:  Etymology and Historical Meanings, Historical Examples of Bachelors (men Who Never Married)

Other articles related to "bachelor":

UNSW School Of History And Philosophy - Undergraduate Degrees Offered
... Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Social Science. ...
UNSW School Of English, Media And Performing Arts - Undergraduate Degrees Offered
... Bachelor of Arts (with Majors in English Media, Culture and Technology Film Studies Theatre and Performance Studies and Music) Bachelor of Arts (Media and Communications) (This program is not accepting new enrolments ...
Comenius University, Faculty Of Mathematics, Physics And Informatics - Bachelor Study
... branches, the students can choose the corresponding bachelor branche of study ... Single specializations of bachelor study are Mathematical Methods in Economy, Experimental Methods of Physics and Software Development ... These branches enable to attain the Bachelor of Science degree after 3 years of study ...
Grace Annie Lockhart
22, 1855 – May 18, 1916) was the first woman in the British Empire to receive a Bachelor's degree ... She received a Bachelor of Science ... New Brunswick, Canada in 1874 and graduated with a degree of Bachelor of Science and English Literature on May 25, 1875 ...
Historical Examples of Bachelors (men Who Never Married)
... Heraclitus Plato Epicurus Horace Plotinus Augustine Aquinas da Vinci Copernicus Raphael Brahe Galileo Descartes Pascal Locke Spinoza Newton Leibniz Bayle Vivaldi Handel Pope Voltaire Hume Smith Kant Gibbon Beethoven Schopenhauer Buchanan Schubert Chopin Kierkegaard Thoreau Brahms James Van Gogh Nietzsche Kafka Tesla Sartre. ...

Famous quotes containing the word bachelor:

    Never trust a husband too far, nor a bachelor too near.
    Helen Rowland (1875–1950)

    ‘I told him, Look at all those fightings and killings down there,
    What’s the matter? Why don’t you put a stop to it?
    ‘I try, he said—That’s all he could do, he looked tired. He’s a bachelor so long, and he likes lentil soup.’
    Allen Ginsberg (b. 1926)

    When a bachelor of philosophy from the Antilles refuses to apply for certification as a teacher on the grounds of his color I say that philosophy has never saved anyone. When someone else strives and strains to prove to me that black men are as intelligent as white men I say that intelligence has never saved anyone: and that is true, for, if philosophy and intelligence are invoked to proclaim the equality of men, they have also been employed to justify the extermination of men.
    Frantz Fanon (1925–1961)