Babylonian Captivity

The Babylonian captivity (or Babylonian exile) was the period in Jewish history during which the Jews of the ancient Kingdom of Judah were captives in Babylon.

Rabbinic sources place the date of the destruction of the First Temple to be 3338 HC (423 BCE) or 3358 HC (403 BCE), while modern historical dating is 587–588 BCE.

Read more about Babylonian Captivity:  Three Deportations, Chronology, The Biblical History of The Exile, Exilic Literature, Significance in Jewish History, Authenticity of Cyrus's Decree

Other articles related to "babylonian captivity, babylonians":

British Israelism - Tenets - Two House Theology
... not captured and deported but remained in their land until the Babylonian Captivity (6th century BC) ... or Judahites who left Judah centuries before the Babylonian Captivity are contrasted by British Israelites to the Jews who remained there (from who the modern Jews they believe descend) ... or ethnic types who had settled there when the Judahites had been deported by the Babylonians ...
Babylonian Captivity (disambiguation)
... The Babylonian captivity was the period in Jewish history during which the Jews of the ancient Kingdom of Judah were captives in Babylon ... Babylonian captivity may also refer to Babylonian Captivity of the Papacy, the Papacy's sojourn in Avignon, France between 1309 and 1378 On the Babylonian Captivity of the Church, a tract written by ...

Famous quotes containing the words captivity and/or babylonian:

    Had it pleased heaven
    To try me with affliction, had they rained
    All kind of sores and shames on my bare head,
    Steeped me in poverty to the very lips,
    Given to captivity me and my utmost hopes,
    I should have found in some place of my soul
    A drop of patience.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    All’s vast that vastness means. Nay, I affirm
    Nature is whole in her least things exprest,
    Nor know we with what scope God builds the worm.
    Our towns are copied fragments from our breast;
    And all man’s Babylons strive but to impart
    The grandeurs of his Babylonian heart.
    Francis Thompson (1859–1907)