Awards and Decorations of The United States Army

Awards and decorations of the United States Army are those military awards including decorations which are issued to members of the United States Army under the authority of the Secretary of the Army. Together with military badges such awards provide an outward display of a service member's accomplishments.

The first recognized medals of the U.S. Army appeared during the American Civil War and were generally issued by local commanders on an unofficial basis. The Medal of Honor was the first award to be established in regulations as a permanent Army decoration, complete with benefits. The Medal of Honor is the only Civil War era award which has survived as a decoration into the modern age.

Furthermore, the U.S. Army mandates that all unit awards will be worn separate from individual awards on the opposite side of a military uniform. The Army is the only service to require this separation between unit and individual decorations. All Army unit awards are worn enclosed in a gold frame.

Read more about Awards And Decorations Of The United States ArmyHistory, United States Army Decorations, Good Conduct Medals, Unit Awards, Service Ribbons, Marksmanship Competition Awards

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Awards And Decorations Of The United States Army - Other Awards - Honorary Awards
... Federal honorary awards (in order of precedence) Decoration for Exceptional Civilian Service Meritorious Civilian Service Award Superior Civilian Service Award Commander's Award for ... Holland Award - awarded to the most outstanding military police unit, company size or smaller, each fiscal year ... Secretary of the Army Awards for Program/Project Management Zachary and Elizabeth Fisher Distinguished Civilian Humanitarian Award Civilian Award for Humanitarian Service ...

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