Author - Relationship Between Author and Publisher

Relationship Between Author and Publisher

The publisher of a work might receive a percentage calculated on a wholesale or a specific price and or a fixed amount on each book that is sold. Publishers, at times, reduced the risk of this type of arrangement, by agreeing only to pay this after a certain amount of copies had sold. In Canada this practice occurred during the 1890s, but was not commonplace until the 1920s.

  • Commissioned: Publishers made publication arrangements, and authors covered all expenses (today the practice of authors paying for their publications is often called vanity publishing, and is looked down upon by many publishers, even though it may have been a common and accepted practice in the past). Publishers would receive a percentage on the sale of every copy of a book, and the author would receive the rest of the money made.

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Other articles related to "relationship between author and publisher, publisher, publishers, authors":

Authoress - Relationship Between Author and Publisher
... The publisher of a work might receive a percentage calculated on a wholesale or a specific price and or a fixed amount on each book that is sold ... Publishers, at times, reduced the risk of this type of arrangement, by agreeing only to pay this after a certain amount of copies had sold ... Commissioned Publishers made publication arrangements, and authors covered all expenses (today the practice of authors self-publishing or paying for their publications ...

Famous quotes containing the words publisher, relationship and/or author:

    To me a book is a message from the gods to mankind; or, if not, should never be published at all.... A message from the gods should be delivered at once. It is damnably blasphemous to talk about the autumn season and so on. How dare the author or publisher demand a price for doing his duty, the highest and most honourable to which a man can be called?
    Aleister Crowley (1875–1947)

    It would be a fallacy to deduce that the slow writer necessarily comes up with superior work. There seems to be scant relationship between prolificness and quality.
    Fannie Hurst (1889–1968)

    If modesty and candor are necessary to an author in his judgment of his own works, no less are they in his reader.
    Sarah Fielding (1710–1768)