Australian Harness Horse of The Year

The Australian Harness Horse of the Year is an honour that recognises the top harness racing horse in the Australia. The award is selected by industry people and media representatives.

The inaugural award was won in 1976 by Don't Retreat, a New South Wales pacer who won 14 of his 24 starts in the 1975-1976 season for a total of $122,415. The first and only trotter to win the award was Maori's Idol in 1978, a season in which he won 22 of his 24 starts. The first three year old to win the award was a year later in 1979, when Run Joe Run won the award, since then a three year old has won the award three times. The youngest horse to win the award was Lombo Pocket Watch who won as a two year old in 2006.

The horses that has won the most awards are Westburn Grant, who won the award in 1989 as a three year old and again in 1991 and 1992, Our Sir Vancelot, who won the 1997, 1998 and 1999 awards and four time Interdominion winner Blakes A Fake in 2007, 2008 and 2010.

Read more about Australian Harness Horse Of The YearPast Winners

Other articles related to "australian harness horse of the year, horses, year, horse":

Australian Harness Horse Of The Year - Past Winners
... Horses that have been crowned Australian Harness Horse of the Year are Year Horse 2011 Smoken Up (NZ) 2010 Blacks A Fake 2009 Mr Feelgood (USA) 2008 Blacks A Fake 2007 ...

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