Australian Endurance Championship

The Australian Endurance Championship was first contested in 1981, as a CAMS sanctioned national motor racing title for car manufacturers. Replacing the Australian Championship of Makes (which had been held from 1976 to 1980), it was decided over a series of endurance races for touring cars complying with CAMS Group C regulations.

In the years 1982 to 1984 the winner of the Australian Endurance Championship was the most successful driver rather than the manufacturer. The Australian Endurance Championship of Makes, run concurrently with the drivers’ title, was the new name for the manufacturers award.

For 1985 the manufacturers’ title was again renamed, now becoming the Australian Manufacturers' Championship. The dual Australian Endurance Championship / Australian Manufacturers' Championship was contested in both 1985 & 1986 over a series of endurance races for Touring cars complying with International Group A regulations.

No Australian Endurance Championship was awarded in the years 1987 to 1989 however the Australian Manufacturers' Championship continued, now contested over the same series of sprint races as the Australian Touring Car Championship.

In 1990 CAMS re-instated the Australian Endurance Championship, once again as a drivers championship run over a series of Touring Car endurance races and they moved the Australian Manufacturers' Championship title back to this series. This format was only maintained for one more year, the final series being run in 1991.

The Australian Endurance Championship title was revived again in 2011 when it was awarded in conjunction with the 2011 Australian Manufacturers' Championship.

Read more about Australian Endurance Championship:  Results

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