Austen

Austen may refer to:

Read more about Austen:  Places, Other Uses

Other articles related to "austen":

Austen - Other Uses
... Austen submachine gun, Australian submachine gun. ...
Lost In Austen
... Lost in Austen is a four-part 2008 British television series for the ITV network, written by Guy Andrews as a fantasy adaptation of Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen ...
Celestina (novel) - Themes - Sensibility
... Jane Austen, who avidly read Smith's novels, responded to Celestina with Sense and Sensibility (begun in the 1790s) and her own Willoughby ... As a teenager Austen wrote parodies of heroes of sensibility, particularly those who focused on their own feelings and ignored their familial duties ... Austen's novel parallels Smith's in its structure and setting both are set primarily in Devonshire and London, for example, both have a heroine who ...
Charles Austen - Flag Rank and Death
... Austen was advanced to rear-admiral on 9 November 1846, and was appointed commander-in-chief in the East Indies and China Station on 14 January 1850 ... On 30 April 1852 Austen had been thanked for his services in Burma by the Governor-General of India, The Marquess of Dalhousie, who subsequently also formally recorded his regret for Austen's death ... Austen is buried in Trincomalee ...
Staffordiidae - Genera
... Genera within the family Staffordiidae include Staffordia Godwin-Austen, 1907 - type genus of the family Staffordia daflaensis (Godwin-Austen) Staffordia staffordi Godwin-Austen ...

Famous quotes containing the word austen:

    What instances must pass before them of ardent, disinterested, self-denying attachment, of heroism, fortitude, patience, resignation—of all the conflicts and the sacrifices that enno ble us most. A sick room may often furnish the worth of volumes.
    —Jane Austen (1775–1817)

    Lady Sondes’ match surprises, but does not offend me; had her
    first marriage been of affection, or had their been a grown-up
    daughter, I should not have forgiven her; but I consider
    everybody as having a right to marry once in their lives for
    love, if they can.
    —Jane Austen (1775–1817)

    How quick come the reasons for approving what we like!
    —Jane Austen (1775–1817)