Au Bon Pain

Au Bon Pain (; English: (Place) of Good Bread) is a fast-casual bakery and cafe chain headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts. Louis Rapuano and Louis Kane founded the first Au Bon Pain in Boston in 1978. Since then, the chain has expanded throughout the U.S. and to India, South Korea and Thailand.

Read more about Au Bon PainHistory

Other articles related to "au bon pain, au":

Panera Bread - Corporate History
... Panera considers its legacy to have begun in 1981 with the original Au Bon Pain Co ... In 1993, Au Bon Pain Co ... May 1999, to expand Panera Bread into a national restaurant, Au Bon Pain Co ...
Prix De L'Arc De Triomphe - Analysis
... Pearl Cap (1931), Brantome (1934), Samos (1935), Corrida (1936, 1937), Eclair au Chocolat (1938), Le Pacha (1941), Djebel (1942), Verso II (1943), Ardan (1944), Nikellora (1 ... Pearl Cap (1931), Brantome (1934), Samos (1935), Corrida (1936, 1937), Eclair au Chocolat (1938), Le Pacha (1941), Djebel (1942), Verso II (1943), Ardan (1944), Nikellora (194 ... Crapom (1933), Brantome (1934), Eclair au Chocolat (1938), Le Pacha (1941), Verso II (1943), Ardan (1944), Tantieme (1950), Sica Boy (1954), Ribot (1955), Saint Crespin (1959), Puissant Chef (1960), Molvedo (19 ...
Au Bon Pain - History
... In 1984, the first Au Bon Pain cafe outside of Boston opened in New York City ... In 1991, the company went public as Au Bon Pain Co ... In 1999, Au Bon Pain Co ...

Famous quotes containing the words pain and/or bon:

    If ever you prove false to one another, since I have taken such pain to bring you together, let all pitiful goers-between be called to the world’s end after my name; call them all Pandars.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    Our books are false by being fragmentary: their sentences are bon mots, and not parts of natural discourse; childish expressions of surprise or pleasure in nature; or, worse, owing a brief notoriety to their petulance, or aversion from the order of nature,—being some curiosity or oddity, designedly not in harmony with nature, and purposely framed to excite surprise, as jugglers do by concealing their means.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)