Atlanta in The American Civil War

Atlanta In The American Civil War

The city of Atlanta, Georgia, was an important rail and commercial center during the American Civil War. Although relatively small in population, the city became a critical point of contention during the Atlanta Campaign in 1864 when a powerful Union army approached from American-held Tennessee. The fall of Atlanta was a critical point in the Civil War, giving the North more confidence, and (along with the victories at Mobile Bay and Winchester) leading to the re-election of President Abraham Lincoln and the eventual surrender of the Confederacy.

Read more about Atlanta In The American Civil War:  Early War Years, Atlanta As A Target, The Fall of Atlanta, Aftermath

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Atlanta In The American Civil War - Aftermath
... The fall of Atlanta was especially noteworthy for its political ramifications ... The capture and fall of Atlanta were extensively covered by Northern newspapers, and significantly boosted Northern morale ... Federal soldiers continued to occupy Atlanta for the rest of the war, with the Confederacy's dwindling resources and military strength, the Confederate army was never in a ...

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