Association For Politics and The Life Sciences

The Association for Politics and the Life Sciences (APLS) was formed in 1981 and exists to study the field of biopolitics as a subfield of political science. APLS owns and publishes an academic peer-reviewed journal, called Politics and the Life Sciences (PLS), semi-annually in March and September. The journal is edited at Indiana University at Bloomington.

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Association For Politics And The Life Sciences - Sources
... "Thomas Wiegele Prominent Founder." Politics and the Life Sciences 1195-96 Johnson, Gary R ... (1992) "Politics and the Life Science A Journal, A Mission, A Vision." Politics and the Life Sciences 113-4 Johnson, Gary R ... (2001) "Politics and the Life Sciences A Second Decade and a Continuing Mission." Politics and the Life Sciences 20 109-118 Somit A ...

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