Association For Intercollegiate Athletics For Women

The Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) was founded in 1971 to govern collegiate women's athletics in the United States and to administer national championships. It evolved out of the Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (founded in 1967). The association was one of the biggest advancements for women's athletics on the collegiate level. Throughout the 1970s, the AIAW grew rapidly in membership and influence, in parallel with the national growth of women's sports following the enactment of Title IX. The AIAW functioned in the equivalent role for college women's programs that the NCAA had been doing for men's programs. Owing to its own success, the AIAW was in a vulnerable position that precipitated conflicts with the NCAA in the early 1980s. Following a one-year overlap in which both organizations staged women's championships, the AIAW discontinued operation, and most member schools continued their women's athletics programs under the governance of the NCAA.

Read more about Association For Intercollegiate Athletics For Women:  History

Other articles related to "women, athletics":

Association For Intercollegiate Athletics For Women - History - AIAW Vs. NCAA
1970s, however, schools began to realize that women's athletics could be profitable, and the NCAA decided to offer women's championships. 1982 indeed the University of Tulsa won both the AIAW and NCAA women's golf championships in 1982) ... participating in the NCAA started to integrate their women's teams ...

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