Arts and Sciences At Washington University in St. Louis

Arts And Sciences At Washington University In St. Louis

The Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis are composed of three divisions: the College of Arts & Sciences, the Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, and University College in Arts & Sciences. The current Dean of the Faculty is Gary S. Wihl, Hortense and Tobias Lewin Distinguished Profossor in the Humanities, who began his tenure in the 2009-10 Academic year. For the 2008-09 academic year, Ralph S. Quatrano was Interim Dean of Arts & Sciences, replacing Executive Vice Chancellor Ed Macias who has taken the role of Provost.

Of Washington University's 11 Fulbright Scholarship recipients in 2011, 7 were recent alumni of the College of Arts & Sciences, and 3 were Arts & Sciences graduate students.

Read more about Arts And Sciences At Washington University In St. Louis:  College of Arts & Sciences, Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, University College in Arts & Sciences

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    A man must be clothed with society, or we shall feel a certain bareness and poverty, as of a displaced and unfurnished member. He is to be dressed in arts and institutions, as well as in body garments. Now and then a man exquisitely made can live alone, and must; but coop up most men and you undo them.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    The great problem of American life [is] the riddle of authority: the difficulty of finding a way, within a liberal and individualistic social order, of living in harmonious and consecrated submission to something larger than oneself.... A yearning for self-transcendence and submission to authority [is] as deeply rooted as the lure of individual liberation.
    Wilfred M. McClay, educator, author. The Masterless: Self and Society in Modern America, p. 4, University of North Carolina Press (1994)

    To make our idea of morality centre on forbidden acts is to defile the imagination and to introduce into our judgments of our fellow-men a secret element of gusto.
    —Robert Louis Stevenson (1850–1894)

    I am not able to instruct you. I can only tell that I have chosen wrong. I have passed my time in study without experience; in the attainment of sciences which can, for the most part, be but remotely useful to mankind. I have purchased knowledge at the expense of all the common comforts of life: I have missed the endearing elegance of female friendship, and the happy commerce of domestic tenderness.
    Samuel Johnson (1709–1784)

    Note too that a faithful study of the liberal arts humanizes character and permits it not to be cruel.
    Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso)

    Mrs. Sneed and her daughter, Miss Austine Sneed, are visiting us—Washington correspondents of excellent character.... We are much interested in their accounts of Washington affairs. Nothing could be further from our desire than to return to Washington and again enter its whirl, either socially or politically, but we are interested in seeing Washington with the roof off.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)