Art

Art is a diverse range of human activities and the products of those activities; this article focuses primarily on the visual arts, which includes the creation of images or objects in fields including painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, and other visual media. Architecture is often included as one of the visual arts; however, like the decorative arts, it involves the creation of objects where the practical considerations of use are essential—in a way that they are usually not for a painting, for example. Music, theatre, film, dance, and other performing arts, as well as literature, and other media such as interactive media are included in a broader definition of art or the arts. Until the 17th century, art referred to any skill or mastery and was not differentiated from crafts or sciences, but in modern usage the fine arts, where aesthetic considerations are paramount, are distinguished from acquired skills in general, and the decorative or applied arts.

Many definitions of art have been proposed by philosophers and others who have characterized art in terms of mimesis, expression, communication of emotion, or other values. During the Romantic period, art came to be seen as "a special faculty of the human mind to be classified with religion and science". Though art's definition is disputed and has changed over time, general descriptions mention an idea of human agency and creation through imaginative or technical skill.

The nature of art, and related concepts such as creativity and interpretation, are explored in a branch of philosophy known as aesthetics.

Read more about Art:  Definition, History, Forms, Genres, Media, and Styles, Purpose of Art, Controversial Art, Art Theories, Classification Disputes, Art, Class, and Value

Other articles related to "art":

Art, Class, and Value
... Art is sometimes perceived as belonging exclusively to higher social classes ... In this context, art is seen as an upper-class activity associated with wealth, the ability to purchase art, and the leisure required to pursue or enjoy it ... Petersburg illustrate this view such vast collections of art are the preserve of the rich, of governments and wealthy organizations ...
Richard Meier - Works
1976 The Atheneum, New Harmony, Indiana, 1979 High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia, 1983 Modern Art Wing Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines, Iowa, 1984 Museum für angewandte Kunst, Frankfurt, Germany ...
Weimar Culture - The Arts
... significant cultural contributions in the fields of literature, art, architecture, music, dance, drama, and the new medium of the motion picture ... German visual art, music, and literature were all strongly influenced by German Expressionism at the start of the Weimar Republic ... Kirkus Reviews remarked upon how much Weimar art was political fiercely experimental, iconoclastic and left-leaning, spiritually hostile to big ...
Post-Breton Surrealism
... Some art historians suggest that World War II effectively disbanded the movement ... However, art historian Sarane Alexandrian (1970) states, "the death of André Breton in 1966 marked the end of Surrealism as an organized movement." There have also been attempts to tie the obituary of the movement to ... The former curator of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Michael Bell, has called this style "veristic Surrealism", which depicts with meticulous ...
Nicolas Poussin - Works
... the popular tendency toward the decorative in French art of his time ... works a survival of the impulses of the Renaissance is coupled with conscious reference to the art of classical antiquity as the standard of excellence ... John on Patmos (1640), (Art Institute of Chicago) and Landscape with a Roman Road (1648), (Dulwich Picture Gallery) ...

Famous quotes containing the word art:

    Museums are just a lot of lies, and the people who make art their business are mostly imposters.... We have infected the pictures in museums with all our stupidities, all our mistakes, all our poverty of spirit. We have turned them into petty and ridiculous things.
    Pablo Picasso (1881–1973)

    The well-educated young woman of 1950 will blend art and sciences in a way we do not dream of; the science will steady the art and the art will give charm to the science. This young woman will marry—yes, indeed, but she will take her pick of men, who will by that time have begun to realize what sort of men it behooves them to be.
    Ellen Henrietta Swallow Richards (1842–1911)

    We do not fear censorship for we have no wish to offend with improprieties or obscenities, but we do demand, as a right, the liberty to show the dark side of wrong, that we may illuminate the bright side of virtue—the same liberty that is conceded to the art of the written word, that art to which we owe the Bible and the works of Shakespeare.
    —D.W. (David Wark)