Arlie Russell Hochschild - Articles About Hochschild

Articles About Hochschild

  • Adams, Bert N. and R.A. Sydie. 2001. Sociological Theory. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press.
  • Alis, David. 2009. "Travail Emotionnel, Dissonance Emotionnelle, et Contrefaçon De I’Intimité: Vingt-Cinq Ans Après La Publication de Managed Heart d’Arlie R. Hochschild." in Politiques de L’Intime, edited by I. Berrebi-Hoffmann. Paris, France: Editions La Decouverte.
  • Farganis, James. 2007. Readings in Social Theory: The Classic Tradition to Post-Modernism. Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill.
  • Garey, Anita Ilta and Karen V. Hansen. 2011. "Introduction: An Eye on Emotion in the Study of Families and Work." pp. 1–14 in At the Heart of Work and Family: Engaging the Ideas of Arlie Hochschild, edited by Anita Ilta Garey and Karen V. Hansen. New Brunswick: NJ.
  • Hanninen, Vilma, Jukka Partanen, and Oili-Helena Ylijoki, eds. 2001. Sosiaalipsykologian Suunnannäyttäjiä. Tampere, Finland: Vastapaino.
  • Sakiyama, Haruo. 2008. "Theoretical Contribution of Arlie Hochschild" (in Japanese). In Japanese Handbook of Sociology, edited by S. Inoue and K. Ito. Kyoto, Japan: Sekai-Shiso-Sya
  • Skucinska, Anna. 2002. "Nowe Obszary Utowardowienia" (in Czech). ZNAK LVii(6):41-63.
  • Smith, Stephen Lloyd. 1999. "Arlie Hochschild: Soft-spoken Conservationist of Emotions: Review and Assessment of Arlie Hochschild's work," in Soundings, Issue 11 - Emotional Labour, Spring 1999, pp. 120–127.
  • Vilma Hanninen, Jukka Partanen, and Oili-Helena Ylijoki (eds.). 2001. Tampere, Finland: Vastapaino.
  • Wharton, Amy S. 2011. "The Sociology of Arlie Hochschild", Work and Occupations, 38(4), pp. 459–464.
  • Williams, Simon J. 1998. Chapter 18. pp. 240–251 in Key Sociological Thinkers, edited by R. Stones. New York: New York University Press.

Read more about this topic:  Arlie Russell Hochschild

Famous quotes containing the words hochschild and/or articles:

    Most women without children spend much more time than men on housework; with children, they devote more time to both housework and child care. Just as there is a wage gap between men and women in the workplace, there is a “leisure gap” between them at home. Most women work one shift at the office or factory and a “second shift” at home.
    —Arlie Hochschild (20th century)

    How many things served us but yesterday as articles of faith, which today we deem but fables?
    Michel de Montaigne (1533–1592)