Aristotle University

Some articles on aristotle university, university, aristotle:

Aristotle University Of Thessaloniki
... The Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (often called the Aristotelian University or University of Thessaloniki) is the largest Greek university, and the largest university in the Balkans ... It was named after the philosopher Aristotle, who was born in Stageira, Chalcidice, about 55 km east of Thessaloniki, in Central Macedonia ... More than 95,000 students study at the Aristotle University, 86,000 in undergraduate programmes and 9,000 in postgraduate programmes ...
Adaptive Educational Hypermedia - Case Studies - Aristotle University
... Conducted by Evangelos Triantafillou, Andreas Pomportsis, and Stavros Demetriadis of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece ...
Aristotle University Of Thessaloniki - History
... The Aristotle University of Thessaloniki was founded in 1925 during the premiership of Alexandros Papanastassiou ... It was the second Greek university at that time, following the University of Athens, and its establishment was legislated under Law 3341/14-6-25 ... the end of the First World War, Smyrni was intended to be the seat of the second Greek university, while the third university was to be established in ...

Famous quotes containing the words university and/or aristotle:

    In bourgeois society, the French and the industrial revolution transformed the authorization of political space. The political revolution put an end to the formalized hierarchy of the ancien regimé.... Concurrently, the industrial revolution subverted the social hierarchy upon which the old political space was based. It transformed the experience of society from one of vertical hierarchy to one of horizontal class stratification.
    Donald M. Lowe, U.S. historian, educator. History of Bourgeois Perception, ch. 4, University of Chicago Press (1982)

    You have both said well,
    And on the cause and question now in hand
    Have glozed, but superficially—not much
    Unlike young men whom Aristotle thought
    Unfit to hear moral philosophy.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)