Apostolic Vicariate of Northern Germany - States and Territories Covered By The Vicariate

States and Territories Covered By The Vicariate

The states and territories covered by the vicariate altered over the long duration of its existence. So the table below tries to present those states and territories which were part of the vicariate before it was territorially reduced for the first time on 6 April 1709.

Owing to its vast extent, Pope Clement XI divided the old Vicariate Apostolic into two vicariates: the Vicariate Apostolic of Upper and Lower Saxony, embracing the portions of the old vicariate situated in the Palatinate and in Lower Saxon Electoral Hanover and the Duchy of Bremen (with the Westphalian Principality of Verden), as well as in Upper Saxon Anhalt (in its then four princely subdivisions), Electoral Brandenburg (comprising the March of Brandenburg and Farther Pomerania), Swedish Hither Pomerania, and Electoral Saxony (still without the 1635-acquired Bohemian fief of Upper and Lower Lusatia). This new Apostolic Vicariate was seated in Hanover city (and thus also called Apostolic Vicariate of Hanover). It was placed in charge of Agostino Steffani, Bishop of Spiga and minister of the Elector Palatine, as vicar Apostolic.

So the rest of the original vicariate, comprising all of Northern Europe north of the Elbe, and Bremen, remained with the Nordic Missions, which retained the title of Vicariate of the North. It was placed under the Auxiliary Bishop of Osnabrück. Since 1743 the Roman Catholics in the Wettin-held imperial fief of Electorate of Saxony were subject to the Apostolic Vicariate of the Saxon Hereditary Lands, later also acceded by Reuss Elder Line, Reuss Younger Line, and Saxe-Altenburg. Saxon Hereditary Lands merged with the Apostolic Prefecture of Upper Lusatia (comprising the post-Napoleonic remainder of Wettin-held Upper Lusatia) into the new Diocese of Meissen on 24 June 1921.

The division between the Nordic Missions and the Upper and Lower Saxon vicariate lasted until 1779/80, when Friedrich Wilhelm von Westphalen, Prince-Bishop of Hildesheim, reunited under his administration the vicariates. On 11 February 1780 the territorially lessened Vicariate of Upper and Lower Saxony remerged into the Nordic Missions. Three years later the Apostolic Vicariate of Sweden was established, then competent for Roman Catholics in the Swedish Empire with Finland and Sweden proper. The Swedish-held imperial fief in Hither Pomerania remained with the Nordic Missions, also after it became Prussian in 1815.

With Pomerania and the March of Brandenburg having ceased to be parts of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806, but become provinces of Prussia, the latter agreed with the Holy See to place the Prussian part of the Nordic Missions under the jurisdictions of neighbouring Prussian dioceses as of 16 August 1821. Thus the Prince-Bishop of Breslau took direct responsibility for the now Prussian-held part of Meissen's former diocesan areas in then Brandenburgian Lower Lusatia and then Silesian (eastern) Upper Lusatia. Breslau wielded its indirect jurisdiction in the remainder of Brandenburg (including Berlin) and most of Pomerania (except of Lauenburg and Bütow Land) by its new Prince-Episcopal Delegation for Brandenburg and Pomerania (staffed in 1824). The diocesan areas of the defunct bishoprics in Prussian Saxony came under the jurisdiction of the Diocese of Paderborn, as was the case with the diocesan area of defunct Minden in Prussian Westphalia.

Also in the Kingdom of Hanover the diocesan areas of defunct bishoprics (Bremen, Verden) were assigned to the neighbouring existing dioceses of Hildesheim and of Osnabrück on 26 March 1824 (Bull "Impensa Romanorum Pontificum").

Also Brunswick (succeeding Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel) and meanwhile only tripartite Anhalt left the Nordic Missions in 1825, but without a persisting domestic Catholic diocese and only few domestic Catholics they formed an Apostolic Vicariate of heir own, also acceded by Saxe-Gotha, Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt, and Schwarzburg-Sondershausen. In 1834 Brunswick, leaving Anhalt apostolic vicariate, merged into the jurisdiction of neighbouring Hanoveran Hildesheim diocese and Norway, leaving the Nordic Missions, became part of the Swedish vicariate the same year. In 1855 northern Norway switched to the Apostolic Prefecture of the North Pole, while the rest of Norway remained with Sweden until 1868. At this time all of Northern Europe formed separate Roman Catholic jurisdictions and had left the Nordic Missions:

  • Apostolic Vicariate of Sweden (already est. on 23 September 1783)
  • Metropolitan Archdiocese of Mohilev (competent for Finland since the Russian takeover in 1809)
  • Apostolic Prefecture of Schleswig-Holstein (est. on 29 July 1868; however, yet without Saxe-Lauenburg, Lübeck free city and Lübeck principality),
  • Apostolic Prefecture of Denmark (est. on 7 August 1868; with Faroe Islands, Greenland and Iceland)
  • Apostolic Prefecture of Norway (est. on 7 August 1868)

Simultaneously with the establishment of the Danish and Norwegian apostolic prefectures the Nordic Missions had been reduced to small member states in the North German Confederation (thus renamed to Apostolic Vicariate of Northern Germany on 7 August 1868), such as the Grand Duchies of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the Duchy of Saxe-Lauenburg (part of Prussia as of 1876), the Hanseatic free cities of Bremen (without Bremerhaven), Hamburg (still with Cuxhaven) and Lübeck, the Principalities of Lübeck (capital Eutin), and Schaumburg-Lippe, and the British Island of Helgoland (joined Germany in 1891).

The table below shows the territories and states at the beginning of the 18th c. and how new jurisdictions developed over the centuries. The table can be sorted by the territories and states, the empires they used to belonged to, the years they bolonged to the Apostolic Vicariate of the Nordic Missions, and the names of the present jurisdictions by clicking on the buttons.

Territory or state Defunct dioceses comprised
Jurisdiction by Northern Missions Later jurisdiction(s)
Today's jurisdiction(s) In early 18th c. affiliated with
Anhalt-Bernburg Halberstadt
Magdeburg (A)
1669–1709,
1670–1709
1780–1825
Upper and Lower Saxony (AV) 1709–1780
Anhalt (AV) 1825–1921
Paderborn (D/A ) 1921–1994
Magdeburg (D) since 1994 Holy Roman Empire Anhalt-Bernburg !Anhalt-Bernburg was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Anhalt-Dessau Halberstadt
Magdeburg (A)
1669–1709,
1670–1709
1780–1825
Upper and Lower Saxony (AV) 1709–1780
Anhalt (AV) 1825–1921
Paderborn (D/A ) 1921–1994
Magdeburg (D) since 1994 Holy Roman Empire Anhalt-Dessau !Anhalt-Dessau was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Anhalt-Köthen Halberstadt
Magdeburg (A)
1669–1709,
1670–1709
1780–1825
Upper and Lower Saxony (AV) 1709–1780
Anhalt (AV) 1825–1921
Paderborn (D/A ) 1921–1994
Magdeburg (D) since 1994 Holy Roman Empire Anhalt-Köthen !Anhalt-Köthen was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Anhalt-Zerbst Bremen (A)
Halberstadt
Magdeburg (A)
1669–1709,
1670–1709
1780–1821/25
Upper and Lower Saxony (AV) 1709–1780
Anhalt (AV) 1825–1921
Paderborn (D/A ) 1921–1994
Münster (D) since 1821
Magdeburg (D) since 1994
Holy Roman Empire Anhalt-Zerbst !Anhalt-Zerbst was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Brandenburg Brandenburg (D)
Cammin
Havelberg
Lebus
Verden (D)
1670–1709,
1688–1708 (Cammin), and all again
1780–1821
Upper and Lower Saxony (AV) 1709–1780
Breslau's (D) Prince-Episcopal Delegation for Brandenburg and Pomerania 1821–1930
Cammin, Lebus and Schneidemühl Prelature (AA) 1951–1972
Berlin (D/A ) since 1930
(Zielona Góra-)Gorzów (D) since 1972
Szczecin-Kamień (D/A ) since 1972
Koszalin-Kołobrzeg (D) since 1972
Holy Roman Empire Brandenburg !Brandenburg with its part of Pomerania was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Bremen Bremen (A) 1670–1709, and again
1780–1930
Upper and Lower Saxony (AV) 1709–1780 Osnabrück (D) since 1930 Holy Roman Empire Bremen city !Bremen city was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Bremen, Verden (D)
Bremen (A)
1669–1721,
1670–1721 (Bremen), and both again
1780–1824
Upper and Lower Saxony (AV) 1709–1780 Hildesheim (D) since 1824 Holy Roman Empire Bremen duchy !Bremen duchy was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Brunswick and Lunenburg Verden (D)
Halberstadt (D)
1669–1709, 1670–1709 (Halberstadt), and both again
1780–1824
Upper and Lower Saxony (AV) 1709–1780 Hildesheim (D) since 1824 Holy Roman Empire Brunswick and Lunenburg Hanover !Hanover electorate was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Brunswick and Lunenburg Minden (D)
Halberstadt (D)
Hildesheim's (D)
Mainz' (A)
Paderborn's (D)
1667–1709, 1669–1709 (Halberstadt), and all again
1780–1834
Upper and Lower Saxony (AV) 1709–1780 Hildesheim (D) since 1834 Holy Roman Empire Brunswick and Lunenburg Wolfenbüttel !Wolfenbüttel duchy was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Denmark Aarhus
Børglum
Lund
Odense
Ribe
Roskilde
Viborg
1688–1868 Denmark (AP) 1868–1892
Denmark (AV) 1892–1953
Copenhagen (D) since 1953 Denmark–Norway Denmark !Denmark was part of Denmark–Norway
Faroe Islands Faroe (D) 1688–1855 North Pole (AP) 1855–1869
Denmark (AP) 1869–1892
Denmark (AV) 1892–1953
Copenhagen (D) since 1953 Denmark–Norway Faroe !The Faroe Islands were part of Denmark–Norway
Finland Abo !Åbo
(Finnish: Turku)
1688–1783 Sweden (AV) 1783–1809
Mohilev (A) 1809–1920
Finland (AV) 1920–1955
Helsinki (D) since 1955 Swedish Empire Finland !Finland was part of the Swedish Empire
Greenland Garðar (D) 1688–1855 North Pole (AP) 1855–1869
Denmark (AP) 1869–1892
Denmark (AV) 1892–1953
Copenhagen (D) since 1953 Denmark–Norway Greenland !Denmark was part of Denmark–Norway
Hamburg, Bremen (A) 1670–1709; and again
1780–1930
Upper and Lower Saxony (AV) 1709–1780
Osnabrück (D) 1930–1994
Hamburg (A) since 1994 Holy Roman Empire Hamburg !Hamburg was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Holstein Bremen (A) 1670–1868 Schleswig-Holstein (AP) 1868–1930
Osnabrück (D) 1930–1994
Hamburg (A) since 1994 Holy Roman Empire Holstein !Holstein was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Iceland Holar !Hólar
Skálholt
1688–1855 North Pole (AP) 1855–1869
Denmark (AP) 1869–1892
Denmark (AV) 1892–1923
Iceland (AP) 1923–1929
Iceland (AA) 1929–1968.
Reykjavík (D) since 1968 Denmark–Norway Iceland !Iceland was part of Denmark–Norway
Lubeck !Lübeck Lubeck !Lübeck (D) 1670–1930 Osnabrück (D) 1930–1994 Hamburg (A) since 1994 Holy Roman Empire Lubeck city !Lübeck city was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Lubeck !Lübeck, Lubeck !Lübeck (D) 1670–1930 Osnabrück (D) 1930–1994 Hamburg (A) since 1994 Holy Roman Empire Lubeck prince-bishopric !Lübeck prince-bishopric was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Mecklenburg-Schwerin Ratzeburg (D)
Schwerin (D)
1670–1930 Osnabrück (D) 1930–1994 Hamburg (A) since 1994 Holy Roman Empire Mecklenburg-Schwerin !Mecklenburg-Schwerin was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Mecklenburg-Strelitz Ratzeburg (D)
Cammin
1670–1930

1688–1930 (Cammin)
Osnabrück (D) 1930–1994 Hamburg (A) since 1994 Holy Roman Empire Mecklenburg-Strelitz !Mecklenburg-Strelitz was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Norway Bergen (D)
Hamar (D)
Oslo (D)
Stavanger (D)
Trondheim
1688–1834 Sweden (AV) 1834–1855
North Pole (AP) 1855–1869
Sweden (AV) 1855–1868
Norway (AP) 1868–1892
Norway (AV) 1892–1931
Oslo (AV) 1931–1953
Missionary District of Central Norway 1931–1935
Central Norway (AP) 1935–1953
Central Norway (AV) 1953–1979
Missionary District of Northern Norway 1931–1944
Northern Norway (AP) 1944–1955
Northern Norway (AV) 1955–1979
Oslo (D) since 1953
Trondheim (TP) since 1979
Tromsø (TP) since 1979
Denmark–Norway Norway !Norway was part of Denmark–Norway
Oldenburg, Bremen (A) 1670–1709, and again
1780–1821
Upper and Lower Saxony (AV) 1709–1780 Münster (D) since 1821 Holy Roman Empire Oldenburg !Oldenburg was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Pomerania, Swedish Cammin
Roskilde
1688–1709, and again
1780–1821
Upper and Lower Saxony (AV) 1709–1780
Breslau's (D) Prince-Episcopal Delegation for Brandenburg and Pomerania 1821–1930
Berlin (D/A ) since 1930 Holy Roman Empire Pomerania, Swedish !Swedish Pomerania was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Saxe-Lauenburg, Ratzeburg (D) 1670–1930 Osnabrück (D) 1930–1994 Hamburg (A) since 1994 Holy Roman Empire Saxe-Lauenburg !Saxe-Lauenburg was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Saxony, Meissen (D)
Merseburg
Naumburg
1677–1709,
1688–1709 (Meissen western part), and all again
1780–1821
Meissen (AA) 1560–1567
Upper Lusatia (AP) 1567–1921
Upper and Lower Saxony (AV) 1709–1743
Saxon Hereditary Lands (AV) 1743–1921
Breslau (D/A ) 1821–1972
Görlitz (AA) 1972–1994
Paderborn (D/A ) 1821–1994
Meissen !(Dresden-)Meissen (D) since 1921
Görlitz (D) since 1994
Magdeburg (D) since 1994
Holy Roman Empire Saxony, electorate !Saxony was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Schaumburg-Lippe Minden (D) 1667–1930 Osnabrück (D) 1930–1965 Hildesheim (D) since 1965 Holy Roman Empire Schaumburg-Lippe !Schaumburg-Lippe was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Schleswig, Schleswig (D) 1688–1868 Schleswig-Holstein (AP) 1868–1920
Schleswig-Holstein (AP) 1920–1930
Osnabrück 1930–1994
Denmark (AV) 1920–1953
Hamburg (A) since 1994
Copenhagen (D) since 1953
Denmark–Norway Schleswig !Schleswig was part of Denmark–Norway
Sweden Linköping (D)
Lund (A)
Skara (D)
Strängnäs (D)
Uppsala (A)
Västerås (D)
Växjö (D)
1688–1783 Sweden (AV) 1783–1953 Stockholm (D) since 1953 Swedish Empire Sweden !Core Sweden was part of the Swedish Empire
Verden Verden (D) 1669–1721, and again
1780–1824
Upper and Lower Saxony (AV) 1709–1780 Hildesheim (D) since 1824 Holy Roman Empire Verden !Verden principality was part of the Holy Roman Empire
Wismar Ratzeburg (D) 1670–1930 Osnabrück (D) 1930–1994 Hamburg (A) since 1994 Holy Roman Empire Wismar !Wismar was part of the Holy Roman Empire

Read more about this topic:  Apostolic Vicariate Of Northern Germany

Famous quotes containing the words covered, states and/or territories:

    This is the village where the funeral
    Stilted its dusty march over deep ruts
    Up the hillside covered with queen’s lace
    To the patch of weeds known finally to all.
    Allen Tate (1899–1979)

    The genius of the United States is not best or most in its executives or legislatures, nor in its ambassadors or authors or colleges, or churches, or parlors, nor even in its newspapers or inventors, but always most in the common people.
    Walt Whitman (1819–1892)

    Imperialism is capitalism at that stage of development at which the dominance of monopolies and finance capitalism is established; in which the export of capital has acquired pronounced importance; in which the division of the world among the international trusts has begun, in which the division of all territories of the globe among the biggest capitalist powers has been completed.
    Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870–1924)