Antiaircraft Artillery Gun

Some articles on artillery:

2nd Guards Field Artillery
... The 2nd Guards Field Artillery Regiment (German 2 ... Garde-Feldartillerie-Regiment) was an artillery unit in the Imperial German Army prior to and during the First World War ...
Artillery - Modern Operations - Air Burst
... The destructiveness of artillery bombardments can be enhanced when some or all of the shells are set for airburst, meaning that they explode in the air above the target instead of upon impact ... Since December 1944 (Battle of the Bulge), proximity fuzed artillery shells have been available that take the guesswork out of this process ...
1st Armoured Division (United Kingdom) - Second World War - Second World War Formation - Artillery
2nd Regiment, Royal Horse Artillery 24/08/42-26/09/44 4th Regiment, Royal Horse Artillery 21/09/42-25/10/43 11th Regiment, Royal Horse Artillery 24/08/42-26/09/44 60th Anti-Tank Regiment ...
198th Signal Battalion (United States) - Lineage
... Artillery Company, 2nd Brigade prior to 9 April 1793 at Dover under Captain Furbee ... Artillery Company, 2nd Brigade, Mustered into Federal service 23 May 1813 at Dover Mustered out of Federal service 2 September 1814 ... Company B Artillery, organized 2 February 1849 at Wilmington redesignated 29 February as the National Guards ...
Weapons of World War I Trench Warfare - Artillery
... Artillery dominated the battlefields of trench warfare ... was rarely successful if it advanced beyond the range of its supporting artillery ... to bombarding the enemy infantry in the trenches, the artillery could be used to precede infantry advances with a creeping barrage, or engage in counter-battery duels to ...

Famous quotes containing the words gun and/or artillery:

    Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. The world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its labourers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children.
    Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890–1969)

    We now demand the light artillery of the intellect; we need the curt, the condensed, the pointed, the readily diffused—in place of the verbose, the detailed, the voluminous, the inaccessible. On the other hand, the lightness of the artillery should not degenerate into pop-gunnery—by which term we may designate the character of the greater portion of the newspaper press—their sole legitimate object being the discussion of ephemeral matters in an ephemeral manner.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1845)