Angelo State University College of Liberal and Fine Arts

Angelo State University College Of Liberal And Fine Arts

Coordinates: 31°26′36.06″N 100°27′57.51″W / 31.4433500°N 100.4659750°W / 31.4433500; -100.4659750

Angelo State University College of Liberal Arts
Established 1965
Dean Dr. Kevin J. Lambert
Academic staff 124
Students 1464
Location San Angelo, Texas
Website College of Liberal Arts

The Angelo State University College Liberal and Fine Arts is a college at Angelo State University in San Angelo, Texas. The College consists of seven departments offering courses, making it the largest college in terms of departments, degrees offered and students at Angelo State University.

Read more about Angelo State University College Of Liberal And Fine Arts:  Center For Security Studies, Academic Departments, External Links

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    It is in the comprehension of the physically disabled, or disordered ... that we are behind our age.... sympathy as a fine art is backward in the growth of progress ...
    Elizabeth Stuart Phelps (1844–1911)

    The present is an age of talkers, and not of doers; and the reason is, that the world is growing old. We are so far advanced in the Arts and Sciences, that we live in retrospect, and dote on past achievement.
    William Hazlitt (1778–1830)

    Barnard’s greatest war service ... was the continuance of full-scale instruction in the liberal arts ... It was Barnard’s responsibility to keep alive in the minds of young people the great liberal tradition of the past and the study of philosophy, of history, of Greek.
    Virginia Crocheron Gildersleeve (1877–1965)

    Some theosophists have arrived at a certain hostility and indignation towards matter, as the Manichean and Plotinus. They distrusted in themselves any looking back to these flesh-pots of Egypt. Plotinus was ashamed of his body. In short, they might all say of matter, what Michael Angelo said of external beauty, “it is the frail and weary weed, in which God dresses the soul, which he has called into time.”
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    To motorists bound to or from the Jersey shore, Perth Amboy consists of five traffic lights that sometimes tie up week-end traffic for miles. While cars creep along or come to a prolonged halt, drivers lean out to discuss with each other this red menace to freedom of the road.
    —For the State of New Jersey, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    It is in the nature of allegory, as opposed to symbolism, to beg the question of absolute reality. The allegorist avails himself of a formal correspondence between “ideas” and “things,” both of which he assumes as given; he need not inquire whether either sphere is “real” or whether, in the final analysis, reality consists in their interaction.
    Charles, Jr. Feidelson, U.S. educator, critic. Symbolism and American Literature, ch. 1, University of Chicago Press (1953)

    Solitude is not measured by the miles of space that intervene between a man and his fellows. The really diligent student in one of the crowded hives of Cambridge College is as solitary as a dervis in the desert.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)