An Essay On The Life and Genius of Samuel Johnson

An Essay On The Life And Genius Of Samuel Johnson

An Essay on the Life and Genius of Samuel Johnson, LL. D. was written by Arthur Murphy and published in 1792. The work serves as a biography of Samuel Johnson and an introduction to his works included in the volume. Murphy also wrote a biography for Henry Fielding in a 1762 edition of his Works and a biography for David Garrick, the Life of David Garrick, in 1801.

Read more about An Essay On The Life And Genius Of Samuel JohnsonBackground, Essay, Critical Response

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List Of Contemporary Accounts Of Samuel Johnson's Life - Accounts - An Essay On The Life and Genius of Samuel Johnson
... An Essay on the Life and Genius of Samuel Johnson, LL.D ... by Arthur Murphy, was published in 1792 ...
An Essay On The Life And Genius Of Samuel Johnson - Critical Response
... about the vulgarity of Murphy's recollections of Johnson's actions "Murphy gave it - on Garricks authority - that when it was asked what was the greatest pleasure, Johnson answered f***ing ...

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