American Society For Engineering Education

The American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) is a non-profit member association, founded in 1893, dedicated to promoting and improving engineering and engineering technology education.

ASEE members include more than 13,000 deans, professors, instructors, students and industry representatives.

Read more about American Society For Engineering Education:  Publications, History, Presidents Since 2000, Awards, Conferences

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American Society For Engineering Education - Conferences
... Conference hosts over 3,000 participants, dedicated to exploring and improving engineering and engineering technology education ...

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