American Printing Company (Fall River Iron Works)

American Printing Company (Fall River Iron Works)

The American Printing Company, located in Fall River, Massachusetts grew to become the largest producer of printed cotton cloth in the United States by the early 20th Century. The company grew as an offshoot of the Fall River Iron Works, established in 1821 by Colonel Richard Borden and Major Bradford Durfee. The American Print Works was established in 1835 by Holder Borden. It employed several thousand workers at its peak during World War I.

Read more about American Printing Company (Fall River Iron Works):  Fall River Iron Works, American Print Works, Expansion, Decline

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American Printing Company (Fall River Iron Works) - Decline
... The cotton mills of Fall River had built their business largely on only one product print cloth ... About 1910, the city's largest employer, the American Printing Company (APC) employed 6,000 people, and was the largest printer of cotton cloth in the world ...

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