American Journal of Occupational Therapy

The American Journal of Occupational Therapy (AJOT) is the official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association. It is published six times per year. It is a peer reviewed journal which focuses on research practice, and health care issues in the field of occupational therapy. The theoretical and conceptual articles featured in each issue represent theory-based research, research reviews and applied research related to innovative program approaches, educational activities and professional trends.

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    More than illness or death, the American journalist fears standing alone against the whim of his owners or the prejudices of his audience. Deprive William Safire of the insignia of the New York Times, and he would have a hard time selling his truths to a weekly broadsheet in suburban Duluth.
    Lewis H. Lapham (b. 1935)

    Show business is the best possible therapy for remorse.
    Anita Loos (1888–1981)

    There is, I confess, a hazard to the philosophical analysis of humor. If one rereads the passages that have been analyzed, one may no longer be able to laugh at them. This is an occupational hazard: Philosophy is taking the laughter out of humor.
    A.P. Martinich (b. 1946)

    The obvious parallels between Star Wars and The Wizard of Oz have frequently been noted: in both there is the orphan hero who is raised on a farm by an aunt and uncle and yearns to escape to adventure. Obi-wan Kenobi resembles the Wizard; the loyal, plucky little robot R2D2 is Toto; C3PO is the Tin Man; and Chewbacca is the Cowardly Lion. Darth Vader replaces the Wicked Witch: this is a patriarchy rather than a matriarchy.
    Andrew Gordon, U.S. educator, critic. “The Inescapable Family in American Science Fiction and Fantasy Films,” Journal of Popular Film and Television (Summer 1992)

    The common faults of American language are an ambition of effect, a want of simplicity, and a turgid abuse of terms.
    James Fenimore Cooper (1789–1851)