American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society

The American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society split off from the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1840 over a number of issues, including the increasing influence of anarchism (and an unwillingness to participate in the government’s political process), hostility to established religion, and feminism in the latter. Prominent members included the brothers Arthur and Lewis Tappan, Samuel Cornish, and Theodore S. Wright.

Famous quotes containing the words society, foreign and/or american:

    The applause we give those who are new to society often proceeds from a secret envying of those already established.
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    There is a close tie of affection between sovereigns and their subjects; and as chaste wives should have no eyes but for their husbands, so faithful liegemen should keep their regards at home and not look after foreign crowns. For my part I like not for my sheep to wear a stranger’s mark nor to dance after a foreigner’s whistle.
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    Because there is very little honor left in American life, there is a certain built-in tendency to destroy masculinity in American men.
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