American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society

The American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society split off from the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1840 over a number of issues, including the increasing influence of anarchism (and an unwillingness to participate in the government’s political process), hostility to established religion, and feminism in the latter. Prominent members included the brothers Arthur and Lewis Tappan, Samuel Cornish, and Theodore S. Wright.

Famous quotes containing the words society, foreign and/or american:

    In every society some men are born to rule, and some to advise.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Our day of dependence, our long apprenticeship to the learning of other lands, draws to a close. The millions, that around us are rushing into life, cannot always be fed on the sere remains of foreign harvests.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    [The ladies] must be aware that a great evil cannot for a long time, predominate, without, at least, their connivance. Silence is often as effectual an advocate in a cause as eloquence.
    —“Censor,” U.S. women’s magazine contributor. American Ladies Magazine, pp. 337-340 (August, 1828)