American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society

The American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society split off from the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1840 over a number of issues, including the increasing influence of anarchism (and an unwillingness to participate in the government’s political process), hostility to established religion, and feminism in the latter. Prominent members included the brothers Arthur and Lewis Tappan, Samuel Cornish, and Theodore S. Wright.

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