America

America usually refers to either:

  • The Americas, a landmass comprising North and South America
  • The United States of America, a country in North America

America may also refer to:

Read more about America:  Other Locations, Astronomy, Film and Television, Literature, Music, Other Media, People, Sports, Vehicles, Video Games

Other articles related to "america":

Cairn - History - The Americas
... Natives of arctic North America (i.e ... In North America, cairns are often petroforms in the shapes of turtles or other animals ... Cairns have been used since pre-Columbian times throughout Latin America to mark trails ...
Joseph Bonaparte - America
... He was also reputed to have encountered the Jersey Devil while hunting there ... Reputedly some Mexican revolutionaries offered to crown him Emperor of Mexico in 1820 but he refused. ...
Volkswagen Scirocco - Scirocco III (2008–present) - Absence of A North American Version
... In April 2007, Volkswagen America vice president Adrian Hallmark claimed that Volkswagen preferred not to bring the Scirocco to North America since it could negatively ... Winterkorn (Volkswagen's CEO), not Volkswagen of America ...
Shriners
... In 2010, the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, as well as Shriners North America, changed its name to Shriners International, now covering nearly 200 temples (chapters) across North ...
Thirteen Colonies
... The Thirteen Colonies were some of the colonies on the Atlantic coast of North America founded between 1607 (Virginia) and 1733 (Georgia) by a variety of interests from England ... known as the founding political entities of the United States of America ... declared their independence and formed a new nation, the United States of America ...

Famous quotes containing the word america:

    Tonight I will speak up and interrupt
    your letters, warning you that wars are coming,
    that the Count will die, that you will accept
    your America back to live like a prim thing
    on the farm in Maine.
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)

    There is no such thing as a free lunch.
    —Anonymous.

    An axiom from economics popular in the 1960s, the words have no known source, though have been dated to the 1840s, when they were used in saloons where snacks were offered to customers. Ascribed to an Italian immigrant outside Grand Central Station, New York, in Alistair Cooke’s America (epilogue, 1973)