Alternative Versions of Doctor Strange

Alternative Versions Of Doctor Strange

Doctor Stephen Strange (commonly known as Doctor Strange) is a fictional character, a superhero who appears in comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character was co-created by writer-editor Stan Lee and artist Steve Ditko, and first appeared in Strange Tales #110 (July 1963).

Debuting in the Silver Age of comics, the character has featured in several self-titled series and Marvel-endorsed products including arcade and video games; animated television series; a direct-to-DVD film; and merchandise such as trading cards.

In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Doctor Strange has had been depicted in other fictional universes.

Read more about Alternative Versions Of Doctor Strange1602, 2099, Amalgam Comics, Bullet Points, Duckworld, Earth-A/Earth-721, Earth X, Exiles, Fantastic Four: The End, Guardians of The Galaxy, Marvel Zombies, MC2, Mutant X, Spider-Ham, Thor: Vikings, Ultimate Doctor Strange, What If?...

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    ... what a strange time it was! Who knew his neighbor? Who was a traitor and who a patriot? The hero of to-day was the suspected of to-morrow.... There were traitors in the most secret council-chambers. Generals, senators, and secretaries looked at each other with suspicious eyes.... It is a great wonder that the city of Washington was not betrayed, burned, destroyed a half-dozen times.
    M. E. W. Sherwood (1826–1903)

    It seems to me that your doctor [Tronchin] is more of a philosopher than a physician. As for me, I much prefer a doctor who is an optimist and who gives me remedies that will improve my health. Philosophical consolations are, after all, useless against real ailments. I know only two kinds of sickness—physical and moral: all the others are purely in the imagination.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694–1773)

    The assumption must be that those who can see value only in tradition, or versions of it, deny man’s ability to adapt to changing circumstances.
    Stephen Bayley (b. 1951)

    Our mother gives us our earliest lessons in love—and its partner, hate. Our father—our “second other”Melaborates on them. Offering us an alternative to the mother-baby relationship . . . presenting a masculine model which can supplement and contrast with the feminine. And providing us with further and perhaps quite different meanings of lovable and loving and being loved.
    Judith Viorst (20th century)