Albert Camus

Albert Camus (; 7 November 1913 – 4 January 1960) was a French pied-noir author, journalist, and philosopher. His views contributed to the rise of the philosophy known as absurdism. He wrote in his essay "The Rebel" that his whole life was devoted to opposing the philosophy of nihilism while still delving deeply into individual freedom. Although often cited as a proponent of existentialism, the philosophy with which Camus was associated during his own lifetime, he rejected this particular label. In an interview in 1945, Camus rejected any ideological associations: "No, I am not an existentialist. Sartre and I are always surprised to see our names linked..."

In 1949, Camus founded the Group for International Liaisons within the Revolutionary Union Movement after his split with Garry Davis's Citizens of the World movement, of which the surrealist André Breton was also a member. The formation of this group, according to Camus, was intended to "denounce two ideologies found in both the USSR and the USA" regarding their idolatry of technology.

Camus was awarded the 1957 Nobel Prize for Literature "for his important literary production, which with clear-sighted earnestness illuminates the problems of the human conscience in our times". He was the second-youngest recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature, after Rudyard Kipling, and the first African-born writer to receive the award. He is the shortest-lived of any Nobel literature laureate to date, having died in an automobile accident just over two years after receiving the award.

Read more about Albert Camus:  Early Years, Literary Career, Revolutionary Union Movement and Europe, Death, Summary of Absurdism, Ideas On The Absurd, Opposition To Totalitarianism, Football

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Jean Sénac - Career - Friendship With Albert Camus
... friendship with French Algerian-born writer and Literary Nobel Prize laureate Albert Camus that lasted from 1947 to 1958 ... In April 1958 he broke relations with Albert Camus on a sour note blaming him for not supporting the plight of an Algerian student named Taleb executed for his political activities against the French ... He did not communicate further with Camus from that day on until Camus' death early 1960 ...
Albert Camus - Works - Collected Essays
... the Resistance Newspaper "Combat", 1944–1947 (1991) Camus at "Combat" Writing 1944–1947 (2005) Albert Camus Contre la Peine de Mort (2011) ...
20th Century In Literature - World War II
... Grey Eminence by Aldous Huxley 1942 The Stranger by Albert Camus (Algeria, France) Our Lady of the Flowers by Jean Genet (France) Flight to Arras by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry Plays The Flies by Jean-Paul Sartre 1943 ... Being and Nothingness by Jean-Paul Sartre The Myth of Sisyphus by Albert Camus 1944 The Horse's Mouth by Joyce Cary Ficciones by Jorge Luis Borges (Argentina ... of Hecate County by Edmund Wilson 1947 The Plague by Albert Camus Under the Volcano by Malcolm Lowry (England, Canada) Bend Sinister by Vladimir Nabokov The Victim by Saul ...
Marcel J. Melançon
... works in Canada and is mostly known for his book on the French philosopher Albert Camus Albert Camus, An Analysis of his thought (Albert Camus ...

Famous quotes by albert camus:

    What is a rebel? A man who says no.
    Albert Camus (1913–1960)

    Men are never convinced of your reasons, of your sincerity, of the seriousness of your sufferings, except by your death. So long as you are alive, your case is doubtful; you have a right only to your skepticism.
    Albert Camus (1913–1960)

    You know very well that I no longer think. I am far too intelligent for that.
    Albert Camus (1913–1960)

    You will never be happy if you continue to search for what happiness consists of. You will never live if you are looking for the meaning of life.
    Albert Camus (1913–1960)

    Helicon: ‘It takes one day to make a senator and ten years to make a worker.’
    Caligula: ‘But I am afraid that it takes twenty years to make a worker out of a senator.’
    Albert Camus (1913–1960)