Albert Camus

Albert Camus (; 7 November 1913 – 4 January 1960) was a French pied-noir author, journalist, and philosopher. His views contributed to the rise of the philosophy known as absurdism. He wrote in his essay "The Rebel" that his whole life was devoted to opposing the philosophy of nihilism while still delving deeply into individual freedom. Although often cited as a proponent of existentialism, the philosophy with which Camus was associated during his own lifetime, he rejected this particular label. In an interview in 1945, Camus rejected any ideological associations: "No, I am not an existentialist. Sartre and I are always surprised to see our names linked..."

In 1949, Camus founded the Group for International Liaisons within the Revolutionary Union Movement after his split with Garry Davis's Citizens of the World movement, of which the surrealist André Breton was also a member. The formation of this group, according to Camus, was intended to "denounce two ideologies found in both the USSR and the USA" regarding their idolatry of technology.

Camus was awarded the 1957 Nobel Prize for Literature "for his important literary production, which with clear-sighted earnestness illuminates the problems of the human conscience in our times". He was the second-youngest recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature, after Rudyard Kipling, and the first African-born writer to receive the award. He is the shortest-lived of any Nobel literature laureate to date, having died in an automobile accident just over two years after receiving the award.

Read more about Albert Camus:  Early Years, Literary Career, Revolutionary Union Movement and Europe, Death, Summary of Absurdism, Ideas On The Absurd, Opposition To Totalitarianism, Football

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Marcel J. Melançon
... known for his book on the French philosopher Albert Camus Albert Camus, An Analysis of his thought (Albert Camus ...
20th Century In Literature - World War II
... by Aldous Huxley 1942 The Stranger by Albert Camus (Algeria, France) Our Lady of the Flowers by Jean Genet (France) Flight to Arras by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry Plays The Flies by Jean-Paul Sartre ... Non-fiction Being and Nothingness by Jean-Paul Sartre The Myth of Sisyphus by Albert Camus 1944 The Horse's Mouth by Joyce Cary Ficciones by Jorge Luis Borges (Argentina) - short stories The Razor's Edge by ... of Hecate County by Edmund Wilson 1947 The Plague by Albert Camus Under the Volcano by Malcolm Lowry (England, Canada) Bend Sinister by Vladimir Nabokov The Victim by ...
Jean Sénac - Career - Friendship With Albert Camus
... a long-running friendship with French Algerian-born writer and Literary Nobel Prize laureate Albert Camus that lasted from 1947 to 1958 ... In April 1958 he broke relations with Albert Camus on a sour note blaming him for not supporting the plight of an Algerian student named Taleb executed for his political activities against the French ... He did not communicate further with Camus from that day on until Camus' death early 1960 ...
Albert Camus - Works - Collected Essays
... from the Resistance Newspaper "Combat", 1944–1947 (1991) Camus at "Combat" Writing 1944–1947 (2005) Albert Camus Contre la Peine de Mort (2011) ...

Famous quotes by albert camus:

    He is asleep. He knows no longer the fatigue of the work of deciding, the work to finish. He sleeps, he has no longer to strain, to force himself, to require of himself that which he cannot do. He no longer bears the cross of that interior life which proscribes rest, distraction, weaknesshe sleeps and thinks no longer, he has no more duties or chores, no, no, and I, old and tired, oh! I envy that he sleeps and will soon die.
    Albert Camus (1913–1960)

    [Liberty] is a chore ... and a long-distance race, quite solitary, quite exhausting.
    Albert Camus (1913–1960)

    The sense of doing good , the satisfaction of being right, the joy of looking favorably upon oneself, dear sir, are powerful levers for keeping us upright and making us progress. On the other hand, if men are deprived of that feeling, they are changed into rabid dogs.
    Albert Camus (1913–1960)

    ... one cannot be happy in exile or in oblivion. One cannot always be a stranger. I want to return to my homeland, make all my loved ones happy. I see no further than this.
    Albert Camus (1913–1960)

    The desire for possession is insatiable, to such a point that it can survive even love itself. To love, therefore, is to sterilize the person one loves.
    Albert Camus (1913–1960)