Alan Coren - Early Life

Early Life

Alan Coren was born in Southgate, North London in 1938, the son of a plumber and a hairdresser.

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Other articles related to "early life, early, life":

James Tobin - Life and Career - Early Life
... In 1935, on his father's advice, Tobin took the entrance exams for Harvard University ... Despite no special preparation for the exams, he passed and was admitted with a national scholarship from the university ...
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Joseph Conrad - Merchant Navy - British Voyages - Master
... with the peoples of the Malay Archipelago, why does this area loom so large in his early work? (Leaving aside The Rescue, whose completion was repeatedly deferred till 1920, the ... nature and the dreariness of human life within it accorded well with the pessimistic mood of his early works." After Johannes Freiesleben, Danish master of the ... calls "the most traumatic journey of his life." After his November 1889 meeting with Thys, and before departing for the Congo, Conrad had again gone to ...

Famous quotes containing the words early life, life and/or early:

    ... business training in early life should not be regarded solely as insurance against destitution in the case of an emergency. For from business experience women can gain, too, knowledge of the world and of human beings, which should be of immeasurable value to their marriage careers. Self-discipline, co-operation, adaptability, efficiency, economic management,—if she learns these in her business life she is liable for many less heartbreaks and disappointments in her married life.
    Hortense Odlum (1892–?)

    In the course of a life devoted less to living than to reading, I have verified many times that literary intentions and theories are nothing more than stimuli and that the final work usually ignores or even contradicts them.
    Jorge Luis Borges (1899–1986)

    The secret of heaven is kept from age to age. No imprudent, no sociable angel ever dropt an early syllable to answer the longings of saints, the fears of mortals. We should have listened on our knees to any favorite, who, by stricter obedience, had brought his thoughts into parallelism with the celestial currents, and could hint to human ears the scenery and circumstance of the newly parted soul.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)